Flypaper

Morgan S. Polikoff, Matthew Duque, and Stephani Wrabel

Editor's note: On Tuesday, February 2, Fordham hosted the ESSA Acountability Design Competition, a first-of-its-kind conference to generate ideas for state accountability frameworks under the newly enacted Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Representatives of ten teams, each from a variety of backgrounds, took the stage to present their outlines before a panel of experts and a live audience. We're publishing a blog post for each team, comprising a video of their presentation and the text of the proposal. Below is one of those ten. Click here to see the others.

A Proposal for School Accountability under ESSA

Morgan S. Polikoff, University of Southern California
Matthew Duque, Baltimore County Public Schools
Stephani Wrabel, University of Southern California

We are pleased to submit this proposal for redesigned school accountability under ESSA. In the past, when states have been given the opportunity to implement new and creative accountability systems better designed to target the schools most in need of intervention and improvement, they have largely failed to do so (Polikoff, McEeachin, Wrabel, and Duque, 2014). ESSA again offers states a great deal of flexibility in the design...

Lydia Burns

Editor's note: On Tuesday, February 2, Fordham hosted the ESSA Acountability Design Competition, a first-of-its-kind conference to generate ideas for state accountability frameworks under the newly enacted Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Representatives of ten teams, each from a variety of backgrounds, took the stage to present their outlines before a panel of experts and a live audience. We're publishing a blog post for each team, comprising a video of their presentation and the text of the proposal. Below is one of those ten. Click here to see the others.

ESSA Accountability Design

A Proposal by the Prichard Committee Student Voice Team

The objectives of our state accountability system are:

  • to create a holistic view of school quality through both academic and nonacademic indicators of success; and
  • to provide students, parents, teachers, administrators, and other stakeholders with the information they need to be effective advocates, understand potential problems within their schools, and strive for all students to receive a beneficial educational experience.

School accountability measures are most effective when they identify what a school is contributing to students, not what...

Josh Boots

Editor's note: On Tuesday, February 2, Fordham hosted the ESSA Acountability Design Competition, a first-of-its-kind conference to generate ideas for state accountability frameworks under the newly enacted Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Representatives of ten teams, each from a variety of backgrounds, took the stage to present their outlines before a panel of experts and a live audience. We're publishing a blog post for each team, comprising a video of their presentation and the text of the proposal. Below is one of those ten. Click here to see the others.

EMPOWERK12 OVERVIEW

EmpowerK12 was born in 2013 as a data support organization for D.C. charter schools. We now work in multiple states and have a broader scope that includes edudata advocacy and professional development, data warehousing and report creation for schools, and construction of district data collaboratives (see here and here.)

Josh Boots, EmpowerK12 Executive Director, played a key role as a charter data leader during the DC Public School Board’s development of the nationally recognized Performance Management Framework (PMF), a school quality index...

Most of today’s K–12 accountability systems are, themselves, persistently underperforming. One of the big problems is that they lean so heavily on student scores from reading and math tests. Even if the system uses growth measures in addition to proficiency, those growth scores are also typically based on reading and math tests.

Though basic literacy and numeracy are invaluable, schools provide boys and girls with so much more. When those other things—citizenship, the arts, non-cognitive skills, and so on—aren’t part of the system, all kinds of unfortunate stuff can happen. Curriculum can narrow, teachers feel constrained, the goals of schooling feel less fulsome, and kids’ opportunities can be limited.

There’s also the problem known as Campbell’s Law, which states that "the more any quantitative social indicator is used for social decision-making, the more subject it will be to corruption pressures and the more apt it will be to distort and corrupt the social processes it is intended to monitor."

The idea is that people and organizations feel compelled to change behavior, often in regrettable ways, to hit targets. So by focusing so specifically on reading and math tests, our accountability systems can actually diminish the value of reading and...

Dale Chu and Eric Lerum

Editor's note: On Tuesday, February 2, Fordham hosted the ESSA Acountability Design Competition, a first-of-its-kind conference to generate ideas for state accountability frameworks under the newly enacted Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Representatives of ten teams, each from a variety of backgrounds, took the stage to present their outlines before a panel of experts and a live audience. We're publishing a blog post for each team, comprising a video of their presentation and the text of the proposal. Below is one of those ten. Click here to see the others.

Performance Contracts and the DMV: The Future of School Accountability

Dale Chu & Eric Lerum

Design objectives

Our state accountability framework is guided by three core principles:

  1. College may not be for everyone, but the option of college must be. Students should be able to participate fully in society, pursue their dreams, and support their families. In the 21st Century, that means every student must be prepared to succeed in college if she chooses. Choice is key here – by definition, an education system that only prepares some
  2. ...
Chad Aldeman

Editor's note: On Tuesday, February 2, Fordham hosted the ESSA Acountability Design Competition, a first-of-its-kind conference to generate ideas for state accountability frameworks under the newly enacted Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). Representatives of ten teams, each from a variety of backgrounds, took the stage to present their outlines before a panel of experts and a live audience. We're publishing a blog post for each team, comprising a video of their presentation and the text of the proposal. Below is one of those ten. Click here to see the others.

Accountability under ESSA: A Model Design

By: Chad Aldeman

Design Objectives

In designing new accountability systems under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), states should strive for three over-arching goals:

  • Simplicity: Accountability is a tool to show parents how their child’s school is performing. As such, the average parent should be able to read and understand how the system works.
  • Clarity: Accountability systems should provide clear signals about which schools need to improve and in what ways. As such, the information must be clearly linked to desired
  • ...

Following in the footsteps of a previous study, CAP researchers have examined the effects of a state’s commitment to standards-based reform (as measured by clear standards, tests aligned to those standards, and whether a state sanctions low-performing schools) on low-income students’ test scores (reading and math achievement on the NAEP from 2003 to 2013). The results indicate that jurisdictions ranked highest in commitment to standards-based reform (e.g., Massachusetts, Florida, Tennessee, the District of Columbia) show stronger gains on NAEP scores for their low-income students. The same relationship seems to be present in states ranked lowest in commitment to standards-based reform: low-income students in Iowa, Kansas, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota did worse.

As you can imagine, a lot of caveats go with the measure of commitment to standards-based reform. Checking the box for “implemented high standards” alone is likely to pose more questions than it answers. Beyond that, implementation, teaching, and assessment of standards are all difficult, if not impossible, to quantify. The authors acknowledge that some of their evidence is “anecdotal and impressionistic,” but they are talking about the “commitment to standards” piece. They are four-square behind NAEP scores as a touchstone of academic success or lack...

A new study out by Tom Dee and his colleagues follows on the heels of a prior evaluation of District of Columbia Public Schools' (DCPS) IMPACT teacher evaluation system, which found largely positive outcomes for the system. This time around, they examined the effects of teacher turnover on student achievement. The new focus is presumably prompted by IMPACT, a multifaceted evaluation system that measures student growth, classroom practice (via observations), and teacher professionalism. Teachers receive scores that range from “ineffective” to “highly effective”; the former are “separated” from the district, while the latter are eligible for one-time bonuses of up to $25,000 and a permanent increase in base pay of up to $27,000 per year.

This evaluation, using data from 2009–10 to 2012–13, covers 103 schools between grades four and eight. It examines achievement at the school level, and then the grade level, for particular years. Analysts examine whether teacher effectiveness and achievement are higher or lower as a result of teachers exiting and entering the system.

The evaluation is a well-designed, quasi-experimental study, so it’s not causal in nature. But like any good analysts, the authors subject their data to a number of checks for “robustness” to rule out...

Full disclosure: I worked briefly (and happily) for Ed Boland, the author of The Battle for Room 314, after leaving my South Bronx classroom. He is a longtime senior executive with Prep for Prep, a heralded nonprofit that seeks out talented students of color in New York City’s public school system, grooms them for placement in elite private schools, and shepherds them into the best colleges in the nation. It’s the closest thing in education to finding a life-changing golden ticket in a Wonka bar.

Beset by a “nagging feeling that the program, as worthy as it was, just wasn’t reaching enough kids or the ones who needed the most help,” Boland starts to wonder if he’d missed his true calling. Raised in a Catholic family of teachers and do-gooders, he sets his mind (and resets his household budget) on becoming a New York City public school teacher. First he works nights and weekends to get his teaching degree. Then he quits his job hobnobbing with the city’s elite and trades his “comfy bourgeois life,” for a job teaching ninth-grade history at “Union Street School.”

To say it didn’t go well would be an understatement. Chantay climbs on her desk and...

  • If you ask a thoughtful question, you may be pleased to receive a smart and germane answer. If you post that question in your widely read newspaper column on education, you’ll sometimes be greeted with such a torrent of spontaneous engagement that you have to write a second column. That’s what happened to the Washington Post’s Jay Matthews, who asked his readers in December to email him their impressions of Common Core and its innovations for math: Was it baffling them, or their kids, when they sat down to tackle an assignment together? He revealed some of the responses last week, and the thrust was definitively in support of the new standards. “My first reaction to a Common Core worksheet was repulsion,” one mother wrote of her first grader’s homework. “I set that aside and learned how to do what [my son] was doing. And something magical happened: I started doing math better in my head.” The testimonials are an illuminating contribution to what has become a sticky subject over the last few months. Common Core advocates would be well advised to let parents know that their kids’ wonky-looking problem sets can be conquered after all.
  • Homework
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