Flypaper

With a title like that, we already know you RSVP'd (if you didn't, what are you waiting for?). More good news! The ten papers being presented at this stupendous conference are now posted online. Your weekend reading is all taken care of--you're welcome. A teaser:

From??Brown v. Board of Education??to "Bong Hits 4 Jesus," the past fifty years have seen a striking rise in judicial supervision of education. From race to speech, from religion to school funding, from discipline to special education, few realms of education policy have escaped the courtroom. Predictably, much controversy has ensued. Supporters of education litigation contend that the courts are essential to secure student (and civil) rights and needs, while critics insist that the courts distort policy and that the mere threat of litigation undermines the authority of teachers and administrators.

Alexander Russo reported earlier today that Institute for Education Sciences director Russ Whitehurst is heading to Brookings. That's true--I hear that he is replacing Tom Loveless as the director of the ??Brown Center on Education Policy. Loveless has been trying to find his successor for the better part of two years now; it looks like it's finally happened. (Loveless will remain a scholar at Brookings, too, I understand.)

Alexander Russo reported earlier today that Institute for Education Sciences director Russ Whitehurst is heading to Brookings. That's true--I hear that he is replacing Tom Loveless as the director of the ??Brown Center on Education Policy. Loveless has been trying to find his successor for the better part of two years now; it looks like it's finally happened. (Loveless will remain a scholar at Brookings, too, I understand.)

Alexander Russo reported earlier today that Institute for Education Sciences director Russ Whitehurst is heading to Brookings. That's true--I hear that he is replacing Tom Loveless as the director of the ??Brown Center on Education Policy. Loveless has been trying to find his successor for the better part of two years now; it looks like it's finally happened. (Loveless will remain a scholar at Brookings, too, I understand.)

Alexander Russo reported earlier today that Institute for Education Sciences director Russ Whitehurst is heading to Brookings. That's true--I hear that he is replacing Tom Loveless as the director of the ??Brown Center on Education Policy. Loveless has been trying to find his successor for the better part of two years now; it looks like it's finally happened. (Loveless will remain a scholar at Brookings, too, I understand.)

A friend pointed me to this New York Times column by Clinton Labor Secretary Robert Reich, wherein he states:

In 1993, some of our children were in classrooms too crowded to learn in, and some districts were shutting preschool and after-school programs.?? Today, such inadequacies are endemic.??

My friend asks, "What evidence could he possibly have in mind?" Good question. There are anecdotes of districts trimming their extra-curricular activities and electives, but where are "classrooms too crowded to learn in"? Who is shutting preschool or after-school programs? Endemic? Really, Mr. Reich?

On this Yom Kippur, Checker Finn atones for his Nixonian associations by highlighting the dire straits of America's urban parochial schools. Read it here.

CER's Jeanne Allen writes an open letter to Jay Mathews at the Washington Post. Amber disagreed with his assessment that merit pay will undermine teamwork--and Jeanne does too.

Stop what you're doing. Put down the casual over-lunch newspaper. The Gadfly is up. What do we have this week? Checker talking about the general malaise over saving Catholic schools. The White House has published a terrific report, but will anyone listen? In the News and Analysis spot, you'll find an illuminating piece by our dear chum Rick Hess. The casual reader may wonder, is Rhee's tough stance on teachers directly proportionate to Rick's affection for her? Questions, questions... Later on, you'll discover that the education conversation has moved to state ballots this November and NCLB's toothless grin popping up in New London, CT. Not only that, but the podcast is stupendous--how can you beat Mike's challege to Papal authority when he asks, Does God hate Catholic schools? His Italian Catholic mother would be shocked. All that and more, here....

"You know, it's tough to ask a teacher who's making $30,000 or $35,000 a year to tighten her belt when people who are making much more than her are living pretty high on the hog." --Senator Barack Obama, October 7th presidential debate

As soon as I heard Senator Obama make this statement last night, I thought to myself, "Are there really that many teachers who only make $30,000 per year?" Sure, there are places in America where starting salaries are still around the $30K mark, but he couldn't mean for us to feel bad for a 22-year-old who's making $31K per year and has to "tighten her belt" by drinking cheap beer instead of micro-brews. His "I empathize with the middle class" statement must have been meant to invoke a teacher with a family, maybe a mortgage payment--you know, real responsibilities. Which implies not rookies but those with, say, at least five years of experience.

How much are those teachers making? I dipped into the National Council on Teacher Quality's nifty collective-bargaining database for the nation's largest 100 school districts to find out. Here are a few interesting tidbits. First,...

Pages