Flypaper

In Sunday's New York Times, Matthew Forney, a former Beijing bureau chief for Time, seeks to correct what he thinks may be a popularly-held hunch that China's growing class of educated urbanites will soon pressure the Chinese government to reform.

On the contrary, says Forney, "Educated young Chinese, far from being embarrassed or upset by their government's human-rights record, rank among the most patriotic, establishment-supporting people you'll meet."

He goes on:

The most obvious explanation for this is the education system, which can accurately be described as indoctrination. Textbooks dwell on China's humiliations at the hands of foreign powers in the 19th century as if they took place yesterday, yet skim over the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s and '70s as if it were ancient history. Students learn the neat calculation that Chairman Mao's tyranny was "30 percent wrong," then the subject is declared closed. The uprising in Tibet in the late 1950s, and the invasion that quashed it, are discussed just long enough to lay blame on the "Dalai clique," a pejorative reference to the circle of advisers around Tibet's spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama.

"Of course," he acknowledges, "the nationalism of young Chinese may soften over time. As college graduates enter the work force and experience their country's corruption and inefficiency, they often grow more critical."

That seems like a smart observation. One can't imagine why young city-dwellers should be especially inclined to question textbooks that exaggerate or lie outright about the glories...

Liam Julian

National Review's John J. Miller recently wrote a portion of our Catholic schools report. Also recently, Miller turned in a NR piece (subscription required) about Wikipedia in which he mentioned Fordham and Mike (Petrilli):

In the current issue of Education Next, Michael Petrelli of the Fordham Foundation complains that Wikipedia's entry on school vouchers contains an abundance of negative commentary, including the claim that vouchers encourage "taxpayer-subsidized ???white flight' from urban public schools." Petrelli points out that the vast majority of students who receive vouchers in Cleveland, Milwaukee, and Washington, D.C. - the few places where private-school-choice programs actually exist - are not white.

Here's the cool part:

Shortly after Petrelli published this observation, a Wikipedian added it to the school-voucher entry. Anybody who reads it now will learn that the white-flight claim is empirically false. "I guess it means that Wikipedia seems to be self-correcting," says Petrelli.

Over at CATO, Andrew Coulson blogs about our Catholic schools report, and says:

It's hard to compete when the other??guy (read:??state-run schools) spends about twice as much per pupil but gives his service away for "free."

It's hard but not impossible. Andrew should check out our chapter on Wichita, which explains how that diocese has made Catholic schools free, too, for all Catholics. They did it by asking all parishioners to tithe a significant portion of their salaries; the response has been overwhelmingly enthusiastic. You might say that Church members agreed to pay a voluntary tax. I wonder what the libertarians at CATO would think about that.

Liam Julian

Check out this, from The Corner, on Mexico's corrupt teachers' union.

Gadfly has not ignored Mexico's union venality: see here and here. And neither have we failed to note that if education south of the border was stronger, there would be far fewer reasons for Mexicans to attempt illegal entry into the U.S.

Liam Julian

"Carney releases education plan for Del."

Step right up and get??your new??education plan! Public schools, private schools--everyone's a winner!

Liam Julian

This week's Economist contains a special report on "digital nomadism," the ability to work, and to connect to family or friends, from just about anywhere. When Coburn Ventures, a consulting firm, first started up, its to-do list was as follows: 1) get BlackBerries, 2) start contacting clients, and 3) find office space at some point. Eight months later, the seven-employee firm decided that it didn't actually need office space; everyone enjoyed the freedom and autonomy of nomadic work.

Twenty years ago, few people would have guessed that businesses could be successfully run without offices. Nonetheless, evermore companies, such as Coburn Ventures, are doing just that.

One can assume that education will go this route, especially private providers that are actively competing against one another for students. Who wouldn't want their kids to attend a virtual school that saved tons of money on facilities and reinvested those dollars into hiring the best teachers and giving students a lot of personal attention?

Education Sector's Bill Tucker penned for The Gadfly several weeks ago a nice overview of how virtual education is aiding high-school reform. (Bill based his article on a report he wrote last summer.) Virtual education is expanding, and as it does, it's taking sundry different shapes. Twenty years from today, will we perhaps have entered an age of educational nomadism?...

Liam Julian

Mike is right: financial literacy is important, but schools can't teach everything. In fact, we wrote as much several months ago in The Gadfly.

To suppose that America's possession of more financially literate 12-year-olds would have somehow staved off or lessened the subprime mortgage crisis, as Bernanke seems to, is really a stretch.

No, it's not good that the "financial know-how" of American high school seniors has "gone from bad to worse." Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke is fired up about it:

The financial preparedness of our nation's youth is essential to their well-being and of vital importance to our economic future. In light of the problems that have arisen in the subprime mortgage market, we are reminded of how critically important it is for individuals to become financially literate at an early age so that they are better prepared to make decisions and navigate an increasingly complex financial marketplace.

Yes, "financial literacy" is something our schools should inculcate. But I'd rank it behind reading, math, history, science, English literature, geography, a foreign language, art, music, and health education, if I had to prioritize. As schools--with a limited amount of time to teach anything--surely must do.

There's more coverage of Fordham's Catholic schools report today, including a front-page Washington Times story (check out the great pictures); a nice Washington Post metro story; a post on "The Corner"; and a New York Sun piece.

Speaking of the Sun, reporter Elizabeth Green got many things right but one big thing wrong. Let's take a look:

A report is being released Friday by a national think tank based in Washington, D.C., the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, concluding that 1,300 inner-city Catholic schools have closed since 1990...

So far so good

...displacing about 300,000 students...

Yes

...and that, if demographic patterns keep up, almost all such Catholic schools could be gone by 2018.

Well, no. What we did say was that if trends continue, another 300,000 students could be displaced over the next twenty years. That would leave many fewer urban Catholic schools--but more than zero....

Liam Julian

In Florida, where a state income tax is verboten, the housing crisis has had a particularly damaging effect on state revenues. Education is being hit hard. Piling on, today the St. Petersburg Times reports that "lackluster lottery sales" will hurt school budgets even more.

Lawmakers, already grappling with a drop in state tax collections, must finalize a 2008-09 state budget over the next three weeks. And they're already planning to cut school spending for the first time in decades. The new forecast could mean deeper cuts. Lottery dollars account for about 5 percent of the state's education spending.

Last year, the New York Times published a long piece about how lotteries are notoriously unreliable vehicles on which to base education funding. And they may actually make legislators less willing to devote dollars to schools because lawmakers sometimes believe (mistakenly) that their state lottery provides education a lot of support. In Florida, for example, the lottery accounts for only 5 percent of state education spending; in other states, the percentage is less.

Florida, though, is saddled with a particularly dubious class-size requirement , which is popular with citizens but costs the Sunshine State loads of money that could be better spent elsewhere. One wonders if the current budget crunch will cause some reevaluation of education priorities....

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