Ohio Gadfly Daily

How should city-level leaders manage a portfolio of schools? The first thing they should do is take stock of the city’s supply of public schools. A new report from IFF, a nonprofit community development financial institution, provides a helpful look at Cleveland’s public schools, both district and charter. In an effort to uncover those with the highest need for quality seats, the analysis slices the city into thirty neighborhoods based on several variables: schools’ academic performance, facility utilization and physical condition, and commuting patterns. The facility analyses are the major contribution of this work, principally the schools’ utilization rates—the ratio of student enrollment to the physical capacity of the building. The utilization rates are needed to determine the actual number of available high-quality seats. The analysts obtained building-capacity statistics through the district; they estimated charter capacity by using the schools’ highest enrollment point (perhaps underreporting charters’ capacity—especially for new schools). Happily, the study reports that Cleveland’s highly rated K–8 schools are at 90 percent capacity. Yet it is less satisfying to learn that its highest-rated high schools are at only 68 percent capacity (the report does not suggest any reasons why). Meanwhile, most of the city’s poorly rated schools are under capacity, averaging 71 percent utilization. The study could be significantly improved in one regard. Its academic measure consists solely of an achievement-based metric—the state’s performance index. But in urban areas in particular, where achievement tends to be low, considering learning gains (a.k.a. “value-added”) is also crucial when evaluating...

We released a new report today, School Closures and Student Achievement: An Analysis of Ohio’s Urban District and Charter Schools, that could change the way we think about school closure.  The study reveals that children displaced by closure make significant academic gains on state math and reading exams after their school closes.

The study examined 198 school closures that occurred between 2006 and 2012 in the Ohio ‘Big Eight’ urban areas (Akron, Canton, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Dayton, Toledo, and Youngstown). The research included 120 closed district-run schools and 78 closed charter schools. Taken together, these closures directly affected 22,722 students—disproportionately low-income, low-achieving, and minority students—who were in grades 3-8 at the point of closure.

Three years after closure, the research found that displaced students made the following cumulative gains:

  • Students who had attended a closed district school gained forty-nine additional days of learning in reading and thirty-four additional days in math and;
  • Students who had attended a closed charter school gained forty-six additional days in math.

Further, the study reveals that students who attended a higher-quality school after closure made even greater progress. Three years after closure, displaced students who transferred to a higher-quality school made the following cumulative gains:

  • Students who had attended a closed district school gained sixty-nine additional days of learning in reading and sixty-three additional days in math and;
  • Students who had attended a closed charter school gained fifty-eight additional days of learning in reading and eighty-eight
  • ...
  1. Efforts are underway to expand Ohio’s College Credit Plus program – providing easier and more widely-available access to courses for high-school students who are ready for the rigor of college work. However, it’s that “ready for the rigor” part that’s causing some trouble with expansion efforts. (Columbus Dispatch, 4/27/15)
     
  2. There are parts of central Ohio where residents live in Columbus, send their kids to an assigned school in one suburb, get their trashed picked up by a second suburb, and get mail delivered from a third suburb. The genesis of this weirdness was rapid annexation of the city of Columbus back in the 1970’s and – school-assignment-and-funding-wise – resulted in something called the Win-Win Agreement in 1986. You can check out this concise Dispatch editorial for a potted history, as well as the editorial board’s take on how the state legislature absolutely cannot mess with the Win-Win Agreement without a lot more careful thought and discussion, no matter if at least one of those “wins” isn’t so winning anymore. (Columbus Dispatch, 4/27/15)
     
  3. Speaking of editorials, the Beacon-Journal had a lulu on Friday. In it, they gave a detailed accounting of how open enrollment works in Coventry Schools, dismissing contentions that it causes financial weakness in the district. They are concerned, however, about open enrollment’s financial effects on Akron Schools – from whence most of Coventry’s enrollees come. This is interesting and highly detailed stuff. The one thing they don’t talk about – that no one
  4. ...
  1. Our own Kathryn Mullen Upton was interviewed on TV in Dayton yesterday, discussing the new Senate bill on charter law reform. Blah blah blah sponsor quality. Blah blah blah great effort to close loopholes. Blah blah blah weed out poor performing schools. Who cares about all that, true though it is? That 3D Fordham logo is the bomb.com! (WHIO-TV, Dayton, 4/23/15)
     
  2. Speaking of said Senate bill, the Blade today joins in on the major-daily opining on the latest effort at charter law reform in Ohio. It is an improvement, they say, but are still not big fans. (Toledo Blade, 4/24/15)
     
  3. Back to Dayton to finish our clips today. Here is a really interesting piece about a woman who undertook a dangerous effort to leave her native Ecuador and come to the United States. Once she got here, her troubles didn’t end. She and her children have ended up in Dayton and after many years, things are starting to look up for them all. One of the brightest spots for mom and daughters alike: Dayton Early College Academy. Worth a listen all the way through. Kudos to journalist Lewis Wallace for this and the other pieces in the Graduating Latino series. (WYSO-FM, Yellow Springs, 4/23/15)

Thank you Chair Hite, Vice Chair Sawyer, and subcommittee members for giving me the opportunity to testify today in support of House Bill 2 and Senate Bill 148.

My name is Chad Aldis. I am the vice president for Ohio policy and advocacy at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a nonprofit research and policy organization with offices in Columbus, Dayton, and Washington, D.C. It’s worth noting, given the subject matter of my testimony, that Fordham’s Dayton office is also a charter school sponsor.

I’d like to start by commending Governor Kasich and legislative leaders from both chambers and both parties for taking on the issue of charter school reform. Despite bipartisan support for charter schools in much of the nation, they remain a deeply divisive issue in Ohio. My hope is that this bill could start to change that. At the end of the day, we all want our students to have access to high-quality schools.

Organizationally, Fordham has long focused on the need to improve accountability and performance in all Ohio schools. Last year, after seeing an onslaught of troubling stories about charter schools, we commissioned research to learn more about the problems that the charter sector was facing.

Getting to the bottom of the issue was important to us because Fordham has long been a supporter of all forms of school choice—including charter schools. We believe that it’s critical for parents to have a variety of high-quality educational options.

Our research consisted...

  1. In case you missed it, our own Aaron Churchill entered the lion’s den in Cincinnati on Monday, participating in a League of Women Voters event on charter school accountability. It appears from Enquirer coverage that he was about the only one who thought that charter law reform efforts were a step forward in Ohio. And if I wasn’t sure from that, then this piece from the “News and Stuff” column of CityBeat sealed it. (Cincinnati Enquirer, 4/21/15; CityBeat Cincinnati, 4/21/15)
     
  2. Also on the topic of charter law reform, editors in Cleveland opine today on the raft of bills in the state legislature aimed at doing just that. Citing the CREDO charter quality study from December and calling the charter sector in Ohio a “wretched, weedy mess”, the PD bosses opine favorably on the reform efforts and in favor of more money to ODE to do the job right. Interesting. (Cleveland Plain Dealer, 4/22/15)
     
  3. Speaking of opiners, the Enquirer continues adjusting to the “post-5-of-8 landscape” they find themselves in here in Ohio. To wit: a guest commentary that evokes school violence as a likely outcome of the loss of mandatory staff levels for counselors. While she’s not wrong that counselors can be vital participants in an education community, why not just advocate for that – especially in Cincy, which is all in on “wraparound services” for students in need. Honestly, she undercuts her own argument by seeming to be OK with bailing on arts instruction.
  4. ...

The University of Kentucky may have lost the NCAA tournament, but Kentuckians can still take heart in their K–12 schools’ promising non-athletic gains. According to this new report, the Bluegrass State’s ACT scores have shot up since it began to implement the Common Core in 2011–12.

Using data from the Kentucky Department of Education, the study compared ACT scores for three cohorts of students who entered eighth grade between the 2007–08 and 2009–10 school years. The first group took the ACT—a state requirement for all eleventh graders—in 2010–11, immediately prior to CCSS implementation. They were therefore not formally exposed to instruction under the new standards. Cohorts two and three took the ACT in 2011–11 and 2012–13, after the introduction of CCSS-aligned curricula. They earned composite scores that were 0.18 and 0.25 points higher, respectively, relative to first cohort. The study authors report this gain as roughly equivalent to three months of additional learning.

The report rightly cautions against reading too much into these early findings. The short interval between Common Core implementation and the cohorts’ ACT scores reduces the effect the standards could have on student achievement. The authors also note that it is not clear whether the scoring gains could have been attributed to other systemic changes, such as new testing, accountability, and teacher evaluation models that were introduced concurrently with Common Core. Nevertheless, considering that Kentucky’s former state standards for math and English language arts both received a D rating in our State of State Standards report,...

The process of reforming charter school law in Ohio took another big step forward last week with the introduction of S.B. 148 in the Ohio Senate. Jointly sponsored by Senator Peggy Lehner (R-Kettering) and Senator Tom Sawyer (D-Akron), the bill is the result of workgroup sessions over the last nine months to craft the best legislation possible to improve charter school oversight and accountability.

The new Senate bill follows on the heels of House Bill 2, a strong charter school reform measure passed by the House last month. The Senate proposal maintains many of the critical provisions that the House bill included and adds some additional measures. Specifically, the Senate bill:

  • Strengthens House language around sponsor hopping
  • Increases transparency around expenditures by operators
  • Requires all sponsors to have a contract with the Ohio Department of Education
  • Incorporates much of Governor Kasich’s proposal related to charter school sponsor oversight
  • Prohibits sponsors from spending charter funds outside of their statutory responsibilities
  • Assists high-performing charter schools with facilities by encouraging co-location and providing some facility funding

We published a full roundup of press coverage of the rollout in a special edition of Gadfly Bites on April 16. Important highlights can be found in the Columbus Dispatch, the Plain Dealer, and the Akron Beacon Journal.

While the coverage has been almost uniformly positive, we urge you to read the op-ed published in the Beacon Journal on Friday, April 17. We have appropriated its title for the title of...

Marianne Lombardo

EDITOR’S NOTE: The original version of this commentary was published on EdReform Now’s blog on April 8. The post contrasted innocent misunderstandings (using Allstate’s elderly-woman-misunderstands-social-media esurance ad) to the more serious act of purposely leading people to misunderstandings. The post simply and succinctly clears the air about how school funding – especially for charter schools – actually works in Ohio.

When “policy experts” purposely mislead the public into misunderstandings about education and school funding, it isn’t a humorous misunderstanding. It’s appalling.

For example, charter school detractors promote the idea that charter schools exist to privatize education and make profits for greedy investors:

“[Mayor Emanuel] took money from these schools . . . and gave it to elite private schools founded by his big campaign contributors. I would stop privatizing our public schools.“

- Jesus “Chuy” Garcia, Chicago Mayor election video

Actually, public charter schools are part of the public education system. They are approved and monitored by public entities. Nationally, nearly 90 percent are run by a non-profit organization (23% in Ohio). These non-profits are very much like other publicly-funded programs that serve children, such as Head Start centers.

Most egregious, however, is when detractors pit families against families with claims about unfair funding:

  • “The way [Ohio’s political leaders have chosen] to fund charters has had a profoundly negative impact on the resources that remain for the 1.6 million kids [who remain] in Ohio’s traditional public schools” – Innovation Ohio report
  • “Ohio
  • ...
  1. The Ohio House last week proposed a funding-based block to try and eliminate PARCC testing in Ohio. Chad is quoted in a story looking at what else – if anything – might replace the current tests. Bottom line: “Be careful what you wish for.” (Cincinnati Enquirer, 4/19/15)
     
  2. Editors in Columbus opined this weekend in favor of the latest salvo in charter law reform in Ohio. To wit: SB 148. (Columbus Dispatch, 4/19/15)
     
  3. Late-breaking news from the Vindy on Friday evening: Youngstown’s superintendent is departing the district at the end of the school year – after a five-year tenure – for the superintendency of an Arkansas district in which he previously worked. This seems a pivotal moment for a district trying to emerge from academic distress. (Youngstown Vindicator, 4/17/15)
     
  4. Editors at the Vindicator also sense the pivotal nature of this superintendent change and they waste no time in reiterating their previous stance that state intervention is urgently required in an op-ed published yesterday. Calling the superintendent’s impending departure a “crisis of leadership,” they insist that it will “require the intervention of Gov. Kasich” to address. They insist that the governor “has no choice but to get directly involved in the selection of a new superintendent.” Yowza. (Youngstown Vindicator, 4/19/15)
     
  5. In some better news, it looks like that mooted bus driver strike in Dayton has been averted. Whew. (Dayton Daily News, 4/19/15)

Pages