Ohio Gadfly Daily

  1. College Board Senior Advisor and Bernard Lee Schwartz Policy Fellow at Fordham Kathleen Porter-Magee talks to the Plain Dealer about the replacement for Ohio’s New Learning Standards as proposed in HB597. Sounds like an inevitable mess should the bill pass. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  2. Week Three of testimony on the aforementioned HB597 begins – and maybe ends? – today in the House Rules Committee. Editors in Canton opine again against the bill, calling the campaign against the Common Core in Ohio “misguided”. (Canton Repository)
     
  3. Something else that editors in Canton are supportive of: teacher evaluation. (Canton Repository)
     
  4. Yesterday, we told you of registration problems for dozens of students in Mansfield, an untold number of whom are still sitting at home days after school started. There was a veiled intimation in that piece that a closed charter school was to blame. Today, the veil is off and without evidence or numbers the district blames the charter – which closed back in June – for failing to send complete records. While I am sympathetic to the work that is created by incomplete records, a couple of questions come to mind: 1. How many of these students had their records given to the charter school from the district in the first place? 2. Why is it apparently considered “going the extra mile” to create temporary schedules for such students to get them out of their houses and into school? 3. Why doesn’t the district have a “new
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  1. Back-to-school time is usually one of hope and possibility, but registration problems in Mansfield schools are causing dozens of students to simply sit and wait to start and parents and guardians to worry about lost time. The implication is that parents/grandparents haven’t done what is required in a timely fashion to register their mobile students – closed charter schools, other districts, etc. – but I can only imagine that the finger-pointing from the district is counter-productive. Suggestion to administrators: start school a day early next year for new kids only. (Mansfield News Journal)
     
  2. Kelli Young takes a look at the history of Stark County’s school districts and their boundaries, and gives us a fascinating piece about the way decisions from decades ago affect student assignments, taxes, transportation decisions, and governance across municipal and county lines today. There is little appetite among the Stark County ESC board to further consolidate, it seems, but Young at least asks the questions that many Stark County parents are asking. (Canton Repository)
     
  3. I missed this editorial from Akron over the weekend. Here it is. But seriously, how many more ways can folks opine in favor of Common Core? I assume we’ll find out this week. (Akron Beacon Journal)
     
  4. A Summit County charter school has been pro-active in creating an assessment and reporting mechanism for teachers and parents of students entering Kindergarten throughout the county this year. There are high hopes that such information will help ease the transition
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Marc Schare

Marc Schare is the Vice President of the Worthington City Schools Board of Education (in suburban Columbus), now serving his ninth year.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Marc Schare testified before the Ohio House of Representatives’ Rules and Reference Committee on August 26, 2014, opposing House Bill 597 which would repeal Ohio’s New Learning Standards. The following is from his written testimony before the committee.

We in Worthington are confused by this legislation. Perplexed really. Baffled might be the right word.

You see, the State told us back in 2009 that our “Excellent” rankings didn’t mean much anymore because Ohio’s academic content standards and cut scores were too low and that too many kids statewide were having to take high school all over again once they got to college. Fair enough, so Ohio responsibly adopted new academic content standards and recommended that we develop a curriculum based on those standards. For the next three years, teams of teachers representing over 20% of our total teaching staff met in small groups to re-write Worthington’s local curriculum. It was an enormous undertaking. The teams would methodically, standard by standard, define learning targets, compile lists of resources, determine best practices and associated professional development on a subject by subject, grade by grade basis. The result of this effort according to preliminary reports from ODE is that Worthington students using our new curriculum performed at their highest level in years.

While all this was going on, our Information Technology department was preparing to implement the...

Released on August 20, The Condition of College & Career Readiness examines the college readiness of the high school class of 2014 using ACT test scores and College Readiness Benchmarks. Approximately 1.85 million students, or 57 percent of all American graduates, took the ACT in 2014—an astounding 18 percent increase since 2010. Ohio students posted an average composite score of 22—relatively unchanged from previous years and one point above the national average. More interesting are the College Readiness Benchmarks, which indicate the chance of a student earning a B or higher in a college course in English composition, Algebra, biology, or social science. The overall report provides this data for the nation, but individual state level data is also available (Ohio’s data). It’s not a pretty picture. Of the 72 percent of Ohio’s 2014 graduating seniors who took the ACT, only one in three (32 percent) scored high enough to be deemed college ready in all four academic areas. Because not every student took the ACT, only around one in four (23 percent) of Ohio seniors can be considered college ready. If, as expected, PARCC sets its cut scores at the college and career ready threshold, Ohioans will to need to prepare themselves for the challenge that awaits as we work to make sure that more students have the skills they need to be successful on whichever path they choose after high school. Check out the report for a more detailed look at the persisting national achievement gap, top...

Last issue, we told you the twisty story of VLT Academy – a charter school in the Cincinnati area that ended up closing for good before the 2014-15 school year. The saga included unprecedented efforts by the Ohio Department of Education to rein in poor authorization practices, a court challenge, a last-minute stay, and parents left scrambling for schools for their children just days before the school year began.

That chapter of the story ended with a new charter school – Hope4Change Academy—setting up a tent outside the locked doors of VLT, looking to sign up families for their school, even though their own sponsor contract was in question and it was entirely possible they wouldn’t open either.

Fast-forward. Ten days later.

The Ohio Department of Education referred the top two leaders of the Portage County Education Service Center for investigation, saying the agency attempted, as sponsor, to open Hope4Change despite being warned not to due to unsatisfactory vetting procedures. Officials of both entities have since traded barbs in the media, indicating yet another chapter to come.

The heart of the matter is that bad charter school authorization practices must end, or parents and students somewhere else—just like those in Cincinnati—will end up scrambling to find quality schools under pressure when their own are shuttered....

  1. State Sen. Peggy Lehner was the headliner at a City Club of Cleveland event on Friday, talking about the state ofK-12 education in Ohio and about ways to improve it. As you can imagine, the Common Core repeal effort underway in Ohio was a prime topic ("This legislation would create chaos in our schools and set us back years."), but the Senate Education Committee Chair also talked about Pre-K, third grade reading, teacher quality, and expulsion policies. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  2. Editors in Canton seem to be on board with the senator’s interests also, opining this weekend in praise of Stark County schools’ efforts to meet the requirements of the Third Grade Reading Guarantee. (Canton Repository)
     
  3. Common Core was also in the Canton paper this weekend. A quick survey of district and ESC officials (and at least one legislator) in Stark County shows broad support for the Common Core. (Canton Repository)
     
  4. Here’s a very thorough report on Common Core with a national take, an Ohio take, and a Cincinnati-centric take (the latter provided by the awesome Julia Carr Smyth). The implication of this piece is that Ohio’s legislature is having “buyer’s remorse” over the standards, but surely this would mean that the legislators on the Rules Committee paid attention when the standards were adopted back in 2010, which we heard last week was not the case. (WCPO-TV, Cincinnati)
     
  5. The Dayton Daily News focused their Common Core coverage on last week’s hearings, drawing
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  1. Lawyers are now involved in the kerfuffle between Portage County ESC and the Ohio Department of Education. So far it sounds mostly like trading barbs in the media, but I’m sure we’ll get to the heart of the matter soon enough: bad charter school authorization practices must end. (Gongwer Ohio)
     
  2. It’s been a bad PR week for Education Service Centers in Ohio. As a result, the awesome Jennifer Smith Richards is digging in to the structure, funding, and function of these public entities. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  3. Perhaps this story highlighting the “constant tension throughout the district” explains the need for “intestinal fortitude” in Youngstown we mentioned earlier this week. A report issued this week says Youngstown school board members need more training as to the proper roles of an elected board, because they are bogged down in day-to-day operations issues. An eye-opening read indeed. (Youngstown Vindicator)
     
  4. Speaking of Y’town, State Superintendent Dick Ross was briefly the chair of the Youngstown Academic Distress Commission before state government called. Four years later, and from the perspective of the superintendency, he is not satisfied with progress made by the district. Seems like a theme. (Youngstown Vindicator)
     
  5. Superintendent Ross visited two districts in Stark County this week, taking a first-hand look at technology integration in schools that won Straight-A grants and talking about the importance of third grade reading in rural schools. (Canton Repository)
     
  6. We’ll end today with a head scratcher. Pursuant to the Education
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It’s nearly school report card time in Ohio. One thing to watch for when examining school performance is whether there are conflicting ratings. For the 2013-14 school year, schools will receive ratings along up to ten dimensions of performance, though no overall letter grade. For example, one might observe a school that receives an “F” on the state’s performance index but at the same time, also receives an “A” on the state’s value-added rating. Or vice-versa. How in the world can this happen?

Keep in mind that these two key ratings—a school’s performance index and value-added—are not the same. The performance index is an indicator of raw student achievement, weighted across a continuum of achievement levels. Value-added, on the other hand, is a statistical estimate of a school’s impact on student progress—expressed as learning gains—over time.[1] Although both measures are based on state test scores, they are different creatures: Achievement tells us more about how students perform; value-added provides evidence on how a school performs (i.e., the productivity of the school staff).

Hence, to understand the quality of a school, we really need both measures. Outside observers—parents, taxpayers, and others—should know whether a school’s students, on average, possess literacy and numeracy skills—that’s achievement. And they should know whether a school is contributing to learning over time—that’s progress.

Now back to the question of mixed ratings. How many schools in Ohio have conflicting results, particularly of the low-achievement but high-progress variety?[2]...

  1. Week Two, Day Two of Common Core repeal hearings was a late one. As predicted, coverage is waning as the hearings go on…unless you follow Chad on Twitter. All of today’s pieces focus on the high-caliber business leaders who testified in favor of Common Core yesterday. Coverage in Cleveland not only addressed the important testimony of Cleveland Partnership’s Joe Roman but also that of CMSD CEO Eric Gordon and Breakthrough’s Alan Rosskamm. Cleveland has had its say. (Cleveland Plain Dealer) Gongwer’s coverage remains thorough, discussing the questions asked by legislators as well as the testimony written and given. (Gongwer Ohio) The Big D, interestingly, also focuses on some of the folks who haven’t testified, including ODE. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  2. Speaking of ODE, news broke yesterday that the department has referred the Portage County ESC’s top two leaders for investigation, saying the agency attempted to open a new charter school in Cincinnati after being warned not to due to unsatisfactory vetting processes. You can check out the just-the-facts version from the Statehouse perspective here. (Gongwer Ohio) The view from Northeast Ohio, where the ESC is located, focuses on the status of PCESC having “the second-worst academic record of all state sponsors”. (Cleveland Plain Dealer) Let us note that the proposed school in question was the one we told you about two weeks ago, which appeared to be attempting to capitalize on the closure of VLT Academy. That is the focus of the coverage in Southwest Ohio,
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  1. Week Two of Common Core hearings got underway yesterday here in Ohio, with testimony focused in support of Ohio’s current standards and opposing HB597 seeking to repeal them. Here is a sampling of coverage: Gongwer’s coverage of testimony is not as thorough as Chad’s Twitter-mania, but very good nonetheless, focusing on the testimony of folks in-the-know on how the Common Core was created and adopted in Ohio. (Gongwer Ohio) Marc Kovac focuses on the testimony of school officials from around the state urging Ohio to stay the course on Common Core. (Youngstown Vindicator) I’m not sure how many more ways there are to opine in favor of Common Core, but editors in Cleveland continue to do so. (Cleveland Plain Dealer) Public media reporter Andy Chow notes that those in-the-know folks were here specifically to rebut misinformation given in earlier testimony. (StateImpact Ohio) Ever the political animals, Gongwer decided to ask the repeal sponsors how they rate their chances of passage. I can’t tell if the answer is optimistic or simply dogged. (Gongwer Ohio) Meanwhile, the Granville Schools board of education passed a resolution on Monday opposing the repeal of Ohio’s New Learning Standards, not only because it torches Common Core but also because it would require a rewrite of all other Ohio standards as well. (Newark Advocate)
     
  2. On to far more important matters, there is a class action lawsuit underway challenging the "adequacy of special education funding" in Ohio. The Advocate reports that
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