Ohio Gadfly Daily

  1. How complicated is school funding in Ohio? According to the legal arguments in this state Supreme Court case pitting a group of local taxpayers vs. their Cincinnati-area school district, very complicated. (Gongwer Ohio)
     
  2. How complicated is verifying student data in Ohio? According to the conflicting responses to a fairly simple question about superintendent sign-offs across the state, very complicated. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  3. Speaking of school funding, last week there was a flurry of stories about a new study (of oddly mysterious provenance) which showed that students in rural areas around the state had less access to AP classes than their urban and suburban counterparts. This was attributed mainly to funding disparities between rich and poor local tax bases. The Vindicator takes on the same study today (with even less detail about where it comes from), but focuses straight-up on the DeRolph rulings of two decades ago and that good old “thorough and efficient” bugbear. (Youngstown Vindicator)
     
  4. CRPE last week released the results of a survey of “public school choice” parents in a number of cities, including Cleveland. The PD took up the story and focused on affect: more of the surveyed parents in Cleveland believe their schools are getting worse than believe they are improving. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  5. The Beacon Journal also took a look at CRPE’s report and noted, with their usual doggedness, that 83 percent of the Cleveland parents surveyed sent their children to charter schools. Now, it makes sense in
  6. ...
  1. School Choice Ohio’s Executive Director Matt Cox penned a terrific editorial piece that ran in the Enquirer today, focusing on the little-reported financial aspects of voucher use in Ohio. (Cincinnati Enquirer)
     
  2. Here’s a fantastic story about the I Know I Can program, whose long-time efforts to link Columbus high school students to college could take a huge leap forward if they achieve their goal of putting a college adviser in every district high school. Laudatory and awesome, but let’s not forget about charter and career tech high schools too!  (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  3. We told you yesterday about the status of Columbus’ parent-trigger pilot – in two months, not a single parent has reached out to the group charged with providing information on options in 20 bottom-of-the-barrel district schools. There was a lot of speculation in that piece as to why this is, and today Dispatch editors put forward their own opinion on the matter.
     
  4. As we mentioned yesterday, charter schools are often criticized for “slick advertising” and “recruiting”, especially when they use state funds to do so. The argument is that school districts can’t do the same. We showed that early college high schools can do it (not charter schools, yes, but not traditional districts either). Today, we see that districts can do it too. Strongsville schools have a PR firm on retainer. Why? The board wants to reach Strongsville residents with a positive message about the schools. Well duh. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
...
  1. With about three weeks until the deadline, not a single Columbus parent has contacted the group responsible for providing information on “parent trigger” options available to them. The Dispatch is attempting to figure out why. There’s a bit of finger pointing and probably too much “us vs. them” here, but the comments are instructive of how choice in general has historically (dis)functioned around here. Check it out and see what you think. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  2. There’s an undercurrent of “us vs. them” in this piece too. It’s an update on the so-called “5 of 8 rule” under consideration for elimination by the State Board of Education. The story dredges up some previous “us vs. them” stuff from Toledo school history, but I have to say I’m with the small-district supe who supports the elimination of the rule in favor of districts determining their own staffing ratios. He knows that the very real backlash stems from a question of trust between districts and their teachers. (Toledo Blade)
     
  3. A continued bus driver shortage in Dayton City Schools has left routes uncovered, caused kids to be regularly late to school, and made at least one parent pretty upset. I’m imagining that charter school parents in Dayton are having an even rougher time. Can we please find some better way to do school transportation? (Dayton Daily News)
     
  4. Springfield’s Global Impact STEM Academy – an early college high school which draws from nearly a dozen districts – is on
  5. ...
  1. On Monday, the Enquirer printed an open letter to the Catholic Archbishop of Cincinnati from a local Catholic-school grad, imploring him to drop Common Core from all the schools under his purview. The lad says Common Core will “remove parents from the education process, reduce teachers to paper-pushers, and concern learning with the vocational rather than the metaphysical.” As if you couldn’t tell from the letter and his avatar photo (or from his aggressive attempts to control the online discussion board in the Enquirer website), this young fellow is a political science major - at none other than Hillsdale College. Go figure. (Cincinnati Enquirer)
     
  2. I wasn’t going to clip the above piece, but since the Superintendent of the Catholic Diocese of Cincinnati decided to pen a response, I thought they would make an excellent counterpoint to one another. He says that the Diocese is “adapting, not adopting” Common Core. (Cincinnati Enquirer)
     
  3. Speaking of Common Core, the very first administration of PARCC’s performance-based assessments in English and Algebra 1 is occurring in Ohio this week. That is, tests that actually count. The folks in Bay Village schools seem confident that their teachers – and their students – have it in the bag thanks to helpful prep, sample questions, and guidance from PARCC. Nice. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  4. As predicted earlier, the effort to eliminate mandatory pay schedules for teachers from Ohio law died when the language was removed from HB 343 in the House Education Committee. Committee Chair Stebelton said the language was a drag on other more important provisions
  5. ...
  1. Reporters affiliated with the Plain Dealer have fanned out across Northeast Ohio to interview 25 district superintendents in some depth. The individual pieces are available via the PD’s website, but here is the overview that opened the interview series, focusing on money. How much the supes make, what kind of benefits they get, what their travel allowances are like, how many are double-dipping, and how many plan to join the double-dippers. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  2. Two clues lead me to believe that the Beacon Journal has tired of writing about charter schools for the moment. First was last week’s “miraculous” story about a seemingly-unbashable charter about whom the reporter had nothing bad to say. A miracle indeed. Second is yesterday’s story digging into a revamped, comprehensive program within Akron City Schools for students removed from their home schools due to discipline problems. The Phoenix Program, housed in a former school building, offers smaller class sizes, incentives for positive behavior and other interventions with the goal of returning troubled pupils to their home schools. It is run by the local YMCA. However, the building is now also houses to other services that may be of use to Phoenix students and their families as well: a branch office of the juvenile court system, the Y, a number of mental health providers, probation officers, and the district’s recently-revived truancy program. (Akron Beacon Journal)
     
  3. We are familiar with the early-college high school concept here in Ohio. Canton is exploring the
  4. ...
  1. Not much education reporting over the Thanksgiving break. The folks at Gongwer took a look ahead at the remainder of the lame-duck legislative session. Specifically, this piece is about two pending education bills likely to see some action. The removal of the mandatory teacher pay schedule, they predict, will not happen this go round (via House action); and the bill to reduce testing time for students to just four hours per subject per student also may not happen (via Senate inaction). We shall see if the prognostications prove correct. (Gongwer Ohio)
     
  2. In 2005, the Columbus City Schools’ board disbanded its budget committee and switched to what is called “policy governance”, which leaves spending decisions largely up to the district administration. In the ensuing ten years, so the Dispatch’s analysis goes, per-pupil spending on regular instruction was down more than 5 percent, and spending on what the reporter calls “bureaucracy” skyrocketed. Not sure that’s entirely fair, given the variety of spending categories that appear on those two lists, but hopes are high that the imminent resurrection of the board’s budget committee will allow the district’s “laserlike focus” on student achievement is properly backed up by spending priorities. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  3. And, in case you missed it: Fordham’s sponsorship team released its annual report for the 2013-14 school year and you can (and should) check it out by clicking here. (Fordham Ohio)
  1. We’ll start today with an item that is only tangentially related to education. Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman announced yesterday that he would not seek a fifth term as mayor. He’s already the longest-serving mayor in Columbus’ history and has a lot to show for his dedication to the city. But his leadership in efforts to help improve education in Columbus – from a citywide afterschool program to the Columbus Education Commission to the visionary (but ultimately doomed) levy that tried to bring reform to the city schools – will be sorely missed. No one on the short list of contenders for the office so far has much cred when it comes to education. Bon chance, Mr. Mayor, wherever you’re off to. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  2. And on to real education news with a bang. There is a possible double-strike whammy looming in Parma at the moment. Both the teachers union and the support-staff union have been negotiating with the district on new contracts (the former for over 18 months!), but both unions have recently rejected offers rather soundly. Words like “last” and “best” are being bandied about, but let’s hope that cooler heads prevail and both strikes can be averted. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  3. Staying in Cleveland for a moment, PD editors opine (again) today on the testing-time limit bill which passed the Ohio House last week. They urge caution, deliberation, and outright blockage of the current bill by either the Senate or the governor.  (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
  4. ...
  1. Not much education news to report on again today, but at least most of it is good news. Here’s an update on a Straight-A Fund project in Springfield. The CareerConnectED consortium already includes two school districts, a tech school, and a STEM academy. They are working to align students’ educational experiences with the high tech skills needed by employers in the area.  They are also looking to add at least two more partners in the next five years. Hey guys, how about a charter school or two? (Springfield News Sun)
     
  2. An opinion piece in the PD today extols the virtues of Ohio’s Jon Peterson Special Needs Scholarship. It is written from the perspective of a service provider (author Lannie Davis is VP of the Julie Billiart School…) and from the perspective of a choice advocate (…and is also a board member of School Choice Ohio).  Nice. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  3. But there’s always some less-good news lurking around the corner. Stay with me on this one. A group of public school zealots have been working hard to create the “feeder pattern” on Columbus’ south side that they would like their children to traverse from elementary through high school. And they had their hearts set on lovely old Stewart Elementary in historic (and tony) German Village. From their base of operations just south of the expensive-old-house zone, they’ve supported renovation of Stewart over the last couple of years. It will likely be a crown jewel for the district
  4. ...
  1. Not much to report on in terms of education news over the weekend. We begin with a bit of a rerun: Editors in Columbus opine again in favor of eliminating the mandatory teacher pay schedule in Ohio. They reason that “Making seniority and extra college coursework the primary basis for rewarding teachers has created a system that is incapable of recognizing and promoting those teachers who actually are best at helping their students. In a field desperate for effectiveness, a teacher who is a miracle worker is treated the same as one who is just marking time.” Why the reiteration of their position? Because the bill including this provision passed the House last week and is now on to the Senate for debate. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  2. Ohio’s teacher evaluation system is on Patrick O’Donnell’s mind in Cleveland. He goes to great lengths to explain how value-add calculations will be done for high school teachers starting this year. He focuses on the way in which “previous year” data will be amalgamated for subjects such as physical science, American history and American government in order to compare to current year data. Skepticism abounds. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  3. Also on the minds of Northeast Ohio reporters this weekend: population loss and declining enrollment in school districts throughout Cuyahoga County. The Greater Cleveland-Akron area's median age increased from 37.2 in 2000 to 40.3 in 2010; Ohio's birthrate has dropped from 14 births per 1,000 women 2003 to 12.6 births in 2012;
  4. ...
  1. In case you missed this yesterday, the Ohio House of Representatives yesterday passed a bill that would limit state testing of K-12 students to just four hours per subject per year. On the Senate, as the old song goes. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  2. The above news should be music to the ears of editors in Canton, who broke from the message of some of their fellow big-city editors around the state and earlier yesterday opined in favor of the testing time-limit bill. They call it “a start”, so are obviously looking for more accountability changes. (Canton Repository)
     
  3. The superintendents of Mentor and Reynoldsburg schools were among a group of school leaders who visited the White House yesterday to help the president “spread the word” about the value of online learning. He’s making a push to get high-speed internet to more schools across the country and both Mentor and Reynoldsburg were held up as prime examples of what computer-based education and blended learning can accomplish. Nice! (StateImpact Ohio)
     
  4. The Clyde-Green Springs school district auctioned off some vacant land, which was bought by the local church. Nice and smooth and everybody seems happy. Can someone please forward this story to the folks in Monroe schools? (Sandusky Register)

Pages