Ohio Gadfly Daily

  1. Unless I missed something, the last (I mean it!) EdChoice Scholarship application deadline finally occurred last Friday. So it is fitting that we learn today that School Choice Ohio’s legal action against Cincinnati and Springfield school districts to get them to provide requested directory information has been 50 percent successful. To wit: a settlement has been reached in mediation with Cincinnati Schools – details to be revealed later. Mediation efforts with Springfield were unsuccessful and so that case will continue in the courts. (Gongwer Ohio)
     
  2. Late yesterday, a 10-day strike notice was filed by teachers in Reynoldsburg. There’s the brink, folks. Let’s try not to go over it. No one wants to relive 1978 again. No one. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  3. Gov. Kasich was cornered by the Big D’s editorial board and asked about the prospects for Common Core repeal in Ohio. The full story is worth a read – just to get to know how Kasich answers questions – but here’s the gist: “Until somebody can show me we’re eroding local control, I see no reason to do anything. And I don’t think they’re (the House) going to do anything, to tell you the truth,” Kasich said. “In my judgment, it isn’t going to get to me, and if it does, it isn’t going to look anything like it is." (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  4. Out with the old… We told you some weeks ago about the brouhaha over the Kings school district’s interim superintendent – including
  5. ...
Categories: 
  1. Editors in Youngstown seem to have reached their limit with ongoing by-the-book efforts to fix the academic ills of the district. They opined this weekend that “the word dysfunction has become synonymous” with the district, said the state “can no longer sit back and let the status quo prevail”, and urged the state to “not wait for community consensus” and act now to restructure the district to benefit children who are “suffering”. Wow. (Youngstown Vindicator)
     
  2. Speaking of weekend editorials, editors in Toledo decried the “circus” of Common Core repeal hearings and urged Governor Kasich to stop the wheel spinning by declaring that he would veto any such repeal bill should it reach his desk. (Toledo Blade)
     
  3. Speaking of last week’s hearings, public radio reporter Andy Chow wanted to get clarification of a potentially incendiary comment made by the sponsor of the repeal bill about the number of “intelligent people” who have or have not testified on certain aspects of the Common Core. To wit: how about hearing testimony on a standard-by-standard basis with pros and cons from “intelligent people” on each side? I’m sure it would be an endless and unwieldy process – and Chad’s fingers would likely fall off in the live-tweet attempt – but I wonder if we’d manage to actually get to the bottom of actual concerns about the actual standards that way? (WKSU-FM, Kent)
     
  4. It’s back to the bargaining table for teachers and administrators in Reynoldsburg – hopefully with
  5. ...
Categories: 
  1. Say you’re someone who wants to open a charter school in Cincinnati, but say that your sponsor was warned in no uncertain terms by the Ohio Department of Education that your school was not allowed to open for a number of, say, very good reasons. What do you do? The folks at Hope4Change took what we’ll call a “counterintuitive” approach.  (Cincinnati Enquirer)
     
  2. Week Three of Common Core hearings was short and sweet compared to previous iterations. I am sorry that I missed this editorial from Cleveland opining in exasperation at the “circus-like” nature of the hearings to that point, but honestly nothing about that description changed yesterday and it’s still a valid comment. (Cleveland Plain Dealer) A revised and amended version of HB597 was debuted yesterday. Gongwer’s coverage focuses on details of all the changes, and takes time to predict more committee hearings in the future. (Gongwer Ohio) Public radio’s Andy Chow discusses the changes in the bill made yesterday but notes that no further hearings or next steps were announced. (WKSU-FM, Kent) As it has done for the last two weeks, covering in the PD remained focused on the issue of ID in the bill – specifically, new language that the sponsor says will address concerns of those who oppose Intelligent Design being taught in schools. (Cleveland Plain Dealer) The change in language related to creationism also gets top billing in the Big D’s coverage, but I would draw your attention to
  3. ...
Categories: 
  1. College Board Senior Advisor and Bernard Lee Schwartz Policy Fellow at Fordham Kathleen Porter-Magee talks to the Plain Dealer about the replacement for Ohio’s New Learning Standards as proposed in HB597. Sounds like an inevitable mess should the bill pass. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  2. Week Three of testimony on the aforementioned HB597 begins – and maybe ends? – today in the House Rules Committee. Editors in Canton opine again against the bill, calling the campaign against the Common Core in Ohio “misguided”. (Canton Repository)
     
  3. Something else that editors in Canton are supportive of: teacher evaluation. (Canton Repository)
     
  4. Yesterday, we told you of registration problems for dozens of students in Mansfield, an untold number of whom are still sitting at home days after school started. There was a veiled intimation in that piece that a closed charter school was to blame. Today, the veil is off and without evidence or numbers the district blames the charter – which closed back in June – for failing to send complete records. While I am sympathetic to the work that is created by incomplete records, a couple of questions come to mind: 1. How many of these students had their records given to the charter school from the district in the first place? 2. Why is it apparently considered “going the extra mile” to create temporary schedules for such students to get them out of their houses and into school? 3. Why doesn’t the district have a “new
  5. ...
Categories: 
  1. Back-to-school time is usually one of hope and possibility, but registration problems in Mansfield schools are causing dozens of students to simply sit and wait to start and parents and guardians to worry about lost time. The implication is that parents/grandparents haven’t done what is required in a timely fashion to register their mobile students – closed charter schools, other districts, etc. – but I can only imagine that the finger-pointing from the district is counter-productive. Suggestion to administrators: start school a day early next year for new kids only. (Mansfield News Journal)
     
  2. Kelli Young takes a look at the history of Stark County’s school districts and their boundaries, and gives us a fascinating piece about the way decisions from decades ago affect student assignments, taxes, transportation decisions, and governance across municipal and county lines today. There is little appetite among the Stark County ESC board to further consolidate, it seems, but Young at least asks the questions that many Stark County parents are asking. (Canton Repository)
     
  3. I missed this editorial from Akron over the weekend. Here it is. But seriously, how many more ways can folks opine in favor of Common Core? I assume we’ll find out this week. (Akron Beacon Journal)
     
  4. A Summit County charter school has been pro-active in creating an assessment and reporting mechanism for teachers and parents of students entering Kindergarten throughout the county this year. There are high hopes that such information will help ease the transition
  5. ...
Categories: 
Marc Schare

Marc Schare is the Vice President of the Worthington City Schools Board of Education (in suburban Columbus), now serving his ninth year.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Marc Schare testified before the Ohio House of Representatives’ Rules and Reference Committee on August 26, 2014, opposing House Bill 597 which would repeal Ohio’s New Learning Standards. The following is from his written testimony before the committee.

We in Worthington are confused by this legislation. Perplexed really. Baffled might be the right word.

You see, the State told us back in 2009 that our “Excellent” rankings didn’t mean much anymore because Ohio’s academic content standards and cut scores were too low and that too many kids statewide were having to take high school all over again once they got to college. Fair enough, so Ohio responsibly adopted new academic content standards and recommended that we develop a curriculum based on those standards. For the next three years, teams of teachers representing over 20% of our total teaching staff met in small groups to re-write Worthington’s local curriculum. It was an enormous undertaking. The teams would methodically, standard by standard, define learning targets, compile lists of resources, determine best practices and associated professional development on a subject by subject, grade by grade basis. The result of this effort according to preliminary reports from ODE is that Worthington students using our new curriculum performed at their highest level in years.

While all this was going on, our Information Technology department was preparing to implement the...

Categories: 

Released on August 20, The Condition of College & Career Readiness examines the college readiness of the high school class of 2014 using ACT test scores and College Readiness Benchmarks. Approximately 1.85 million students, or 57 percent of all American graduates, took the ACT in 2014—an astounding 18 percent increase since 2010. Ohio students posted an average composite score of 22—relatively unchanged from previous years and one point above the national average. More interesting are the College Readiness Benchmarks, which indicate the chance of a student earning a B or higher in a college course in English composition, Algebra, biology, or social science. The overall report provides this data for the nation, but individual state level data is also available (Ohio’s data). It’s not a pretty picture. Of the 72 percent of Ohio’s 2014 graduating seniors who took the ACT, only one in three (32 percent) scored high enough to be deemed college ready in all four academic areas. Because not every student took the ACT, only around one in four (23 percent) of Ohio seniors can be considered college ready. If, as expected, PARCC sets its cut scores at the college and career ready threshold, Ohioans will to need to prepare themselves for the challenge that awaits as we work to make sure that more students have the skills they need to be successful on whichever path they choose after high school. Check out the report for a more detailed look at the persisting national achievement gap, top...

Categories: 

Last issue, we told you the twisty story of VLT Academy – a charter school in the Cincinnati area that ended up closing for good before the 2014-15 school year. The saga included unprecedented efforts by the Ohio Department of Education to rein in poor authorization practices, a court challenge, a last-minute stay, and parents left scrambling for schools for their children just days before the school year began.

That chapter of the story ended with a new charter school – Hope4Change Academy—setting up a tent outside the locked doors of VLT, looking to sign up families for their school, even though their own sponsor contract was in question and it was entirely possible they wouldn’t open either.

Fast-forward. Ten days later.

The Ohio Department of Education referred the top two leaders of the Portage County Education Service Center for investigation, saying the agency attempted, as sponsor, to open Hope4Change despite being warned not to due to unsatisfactory vetting procedures. Officials of both entities have since traded barbs in the media, indicating yet another chapter to come.

The heart of the matter is that bad charter school authorization practices must end, or parents and students somewhere else—just like those in Cincinnati—will end up scrambling to find quality schools under pressure when their own are shuttered....

Categories: 
  1. State Sen. Peggy Lehner was the headliner at a City Club of Cleveland event on Friday, talking about the state ofK-12 education in Ohio and about ways to improve it. As you can imagine, the Common Core repeal effort underway in Ohio was a prime topic ("This legislation would create chaos in our schools and set us back years."), but the Senate Education Committee Chair also talked about Pre-K, third grade reading, teacher quality, and expulsion policies. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  2. Editors in Canton seem to be on board with the senator’s interests also, opining this weekend in praise of Stark County schools’ efforts to meet the requirements of the Third Grade Reading Guarantee. (Canton Repository)
     
  3. Common Core was also in the Canton paper this weekend. A quick survey of district and ESC officials (and at least one legislator) in Stark County shows broad support for the Common Core. (Canton Repository)
     
  4. Here’s a very thorough report on Common Core with a national take, an Ohio take, and a Cincinnati-centric take (the latter provided by the awesome Julia Carr Smyth). The implication of this piece is that Ohio’s legislature is having “buyer’s remorse” over the standards, but surely this would mean that the legislators on the Rules Committee paid attention when the standards were adopted back in 2010, which we heard last week was not the case. (WCPO-TV, Cincinnati)
     
  5. The Dayton Daily News focused their Common Core coverage on last week’s hearings, drawing
  6. ...
Categories: 
  1. Lawyers are now involved in the kerfuffle between Portage County ESC and the Ohio Department of Education. So far it sounds mostly like trading barbs in the media, but I’m sure we’ll get to the heart of the matter soon enough: bad charter school authorization practices must end. (Gongwer Ohio)
     
  2. It’s been a bad PR week for Education Service Centers in Ohio. As a result, the awesome Jennifer Smith Richards is digging in to the structure, funding, and function of these public entities. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  3. Perhaps this story highlighting the “constant tension throughout the district” explains the need for “intestinal fortitude” in Youngstown we mentioned earlier this week. A report issued this week says Youngstown school board members need more training as to the proper roles of an elected board, because they are bogged down in day-to-day operations issues. An eye-opening read indeed. (Youngstown Vindicator)
     
  4. Speaking of Y’town, State Superintendent Dick Ross was briefly the chair of the Youngstown Academic Distress Commission before state government called. Four years later, and from the perspective of the superintendency, he is not satisfied with progress made by the district. Seems like a theme. (Youngstown Vindicator)
     
  5. Superintendent Ross visited two districts in Stark County this week, taking a first-hand look at technology integration in schools that won Straight-A grants and talking about the importance of third grade reading in rural schools. (Canton Repository)
     
  6. We’ll end today with a head scratcher. Pursuant to the Education
  7. ...
Categories: 

Pages