Ohio Gadfly Daily

Isabel Sawhill is the founder of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, an effort from which she draws much of the impetus for her latest book: Generation Unbound. She reviews decades of research and literature to support the notion that “traditional” patterns of education, marriage, and parenting—in that order—are a thing of the past, especially in the lives of low-income individuals. Delayed parenting—one of the pillars of the “success sequence” that some education pundits espouse—is largely nonexistent in impoverished communities, where we fervently believe education can do so much to help break the cycle of poverty. Sawhill notes that these are facts of modern life, like it or not (a traditionalist, she seems not to like them very much). Ideologues on the left argue for more social support for unmarried parents; those on the right for a return to traditional marriage. Sawhill posits a third way—foregrounding the various downsides of single parenthood, providing as much information about and access to long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) as possible, and even incentivizing their promotion and use. With this “split the difference” approach, sure to be controversial with many, she believes that many young people who would otherwise simply drift...

On September 19, teachers in the Columbus suburb of Reynoldsburg went out on strike for the first time since 1978. They started the school year without a contract in place, and neither two-party negotiations nor third-party mediation led to a breakthrough.

The initial contract offer from the district included a couple of notions that were thought by outside commentators to be problematic, including performance-based pay for teachers and the elimination of health care coverage in favor of a cash payment that teachers could use to buy their own coverage. As divisive as those issues could have been, they were actually pretty well hammered out before the walkout. The sticking point turned out to be a hard cap on class sizes.

With little movement on either side on this issue—and after dueling unfair labor practice charges were filed—the strike began. Day One was rough, but by the end of the first full week the feared “spillover” effects of the strike were not seen at Friday night’s big football game. But those Day One stories moved one district parent to sue to close the schools for the duration of the strike, citing...

  1. Fordham was name-checked as a “reputable” charter school sponsor as editors in Columbus opined on recent stories about the questionable lease deals enjoyed by some Imagine charter schools. (Columbus Dispatch)
  2. The story here is likely to be “more charter school shenanigans” as far as charter detractors are concerned, but a few things about this story of a former school leader convicted of fiscal malfeasance stand out to me. First, questionable spending came to light via a tip to the state auditor’s office. This is typical of how these things go with district schools, ESCs, and even student booster clubs. The news is full of them. Second, the tip came in 2013 and was acted upon quickly and decisively. It is over in less than a year, with repayment of funds ordered. Far quicker and simpler than Columbus’ data scrubbing crimes and even some athletic booster misfeasance that has been floating around for two years or more. Third, and perhaps most important, the charter schools in question survived the removal of a leader (good riddance) and seem to be continuing to serve their students as well as or better than the neighborhood schools. Call it shenanigans if you
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  1. Fantastic story from The Atlantic today on the newest Cristo Rey High School, which started its second year in Columbus in September in a newly-renovated historic building downtown. Very nice profile here, especially if you’re not familiar with the innovative Cristo Rey model. (The Atlantic)
  2. Speaking of schools getting it right, here’s a nice profile of Mansfield schools’ Spanish immersion program. It’s so popular that it is attracting students – and funding – from outside the district. The story is great, the online comments are less so. (Mansfield News Journal)
  3. The Reynoldsburg strike is already ancient history for us outsiders after just a week, but there are at least two more districts in Ohio whose teachers are working without contracts and in which negotiations are – thankfully – ongoing. Some good progress, it seems, in Lexington schools yesterday. Earlier stories, searchable from the News Journal’s website, indicate that one of the biggest sticking points here is the district’s current teacher evaluation processes. (Mansfield News Journal)
  4. We mentioned earlier this week that it is the season for districts’ 5-year budget forecasts. Mentor City Schools got downright philosophical in their budget presentation: “You can only
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  1. As with many others across Ohio, the Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce staunchly backs Common Core. They held an event yesterday focusing on “the business case for the Common Core” to explain, again, why. (Dayton Daily News)
  2. Speaking of Common Core, here’s an interesting look at changes in teacher training programs in Ohio in the wake of adoption of Ohio’s New Learning Standards four years ago. (StateImpact Ohio)
  3. The PD takes on the question of whether there is too much testing in schools these days, checking in with the Council of Chief State School Officers and the Council of the Great City Schools for their take. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
  4. Well that’s a turn up for the books. Board members at an Imagine charter school in Columbus agree with their detractors that their lease deal is a drag on the budget and have asked their landlord for a fix. Interesting. (Columbus Dispatch)
  5. I’m sure the terms “territory transfer” and “abolish the district” are required legal-ese in Ohio’s Byzantine system for school district mergers, but they seem to be unnecessary tripping points for folks in the proposed merger of the Cardinal and Ledgemont
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  1. You would think that interest in the 2013-14 school report cards would be waning by now, a few weeks after publication, and you’d be right. The PD, fresh from breaking the news that things actually are improving measurably in Cleveland schools, is already turning its attention to next year’s report cards, noting that the introduction of PARCC exams may delay results by months…a lot of them. Part of the anticipated delay is that state education officials want to wait to see how kids did on the tests before determining new cut scores, and therefore the report card results for test scores. Luckily, Fordham’s Aaron Churchill was there to set the record straight: most schools should brace for some lower-than-average performance. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
  2. This is the story of John Carter, 24, of West Carrollton, a man who not only beat the odds to simply survive but also took good advantage of all the assistance and opportunities available to him to thrive. There are a lot of players in his story, including his family, a local church, a charter school, and Sinclair Community College. But the story, and the success he is making of his life against some
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  1. The latest legislative assault against Common Core in Ohio is rumbling back to life this evening with what is supposed to be testimony from teachers who support repeal of the Common Core. Ahead of this testimony, the Chillicothe Gazette looked at some specific math problems aligned to Common Core and solicited responses on them from teachers and professors on both sides of the issue. Some good stuff here…much of which will not be part of tonight’s hearing. (Chillicothe Gazette)
  2. Discussion of yesterday’s story about the facilities funding set up of Imagine charter schools continues in the expected corners today. The Blade’s piece is typical of them all, with the blasting and the demanding. (Toledo Blade)
  3. Springfield City Schools approved a one-to-one technology plan for students in grades three through twelve. But those new laptops and software packages have to be teacher-tested first. This is a story about that. Apparently, there was “a lot of oohing and ahhing going on” during the training sessions last week. (Springfield News-Sun)
  4. It is that time of year again: school district treasurers releasing their five-year funding forecasts. Canton City Schools continues to lose students – EdChoice vouchers are the
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  1. We’re back after a short break, and there’s a lot to talk about, so let’s get right to it. The board chair of Fordham-sponsored Dayton Leadership Academy penned a guest column in the Dayton Daily News last Friday, highlighting signs of success for DLA students buried deep in this year’s report card data. Nice. (Dayton Daily News)
  2. Fordham’s Chad Aldis is quoted in a story from yesterday’s Dispatch, looking at the lease deals under which Imagine charter schools occupy the buildings in which they operate. There’s probably some more info required to make sense out of these numbers. (Columbus Dispatch)
  3. I don’t want to argue causation, but just as soon as Gadfly Bites took its hiatus, a breakthrough occurred and the Reynoldsburg teachers strike ended. (ThisWeek News/Reynoldsburg News)
  4. The Big D took a look at the details of the new contract in Reynoldsburg – as far as they were known at the time – and tried to parse what this will mean for teachers (and students) for the next three years. (Columbus Dispatch)
  5. There are still a few issues to work out in Reynoldsburg as teachers return to the classroom. Today’s article
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Last week, the Ohio Education Research Center (OERC) hosted a terrific conference at Ohio State University which brought together the state’s education research and practitioner communities. The focus of the one-day conference was teacher quality—why it matters, and how Ohio’s teacher-quality initiatives are playing out in the field.

In his keynote address, Eric Hanushek of Stanford University set the table, zeroing in on the economic value of a high-quality teacher. He showed that students who are fortunate enough to have high-quality teachers are more likely to have higher lifetime earnings than those less fortunate. The implication was easily understood: It cannot be left to chance as to whether students get a high-quality educator.

But here’s the rub: Less clear is what policies help to ensure that every Buckeye student is taught by a great teacher from Kindergarten through high-school graduation. Hanushek pointed out that several variables commonly used to measure teacher quality—including Master’s degrees, experience after a few years of teaching, and participation in professional-development programs—only weakly correlate to actual effectiveness.

A panel discussion wrestled with the ambiguity and complexity involved in raising teacher quality. (The slide decks are available here.) The panel, moderated by Rebecca Watts...

Note: Gadfly Bites is taking a break for the rest of the week. Back on Monday with a round up.

  1. Patrick O’Donnell has dug into Cleveland schools’ value add scores and teased out what the district believes are substantive gains in this area for students tested over the last two years. There’s some speculation that charter school students in the district’s portfolio helped bring up the grade, but even more speculation that important aspects of the Cleveland plan are starting to bear fruit: observable, data-based fruit. But, says CEO Eric Gordon, "we can't afford simply to meet (expected progress). We have to exceed the state's expectations for my kids to step up… But you have to start somewhere…2014-15 will be about exceeding." Nice. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
  2. The board of education in Strongsville is concerned about unpaid fees from its families, for things such as art supplies and participation in sports, to the tune of about $170,000. They voted unanimously to withhold report cards and online access to grades—among other steps—for those delinquent families. I am certain that their students rose up in a unanimous cheer when this was announced. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
  3. The court-ordered mediation
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