Learning Time in America: Trends to Reform the American School Calendar: A Snapshot of Federal, State, and Local Action

 

Learning Time in America coverWith its profiles of numerous districts and
states successfully engaged in longer school days and/or years, this report from the National Center on Time and
Learning and the Education Commission of the States is a boost for those pushing
to keep intact—and even expand—learning time in this austere climate. It
illustrates this with a few real programs (Massachusetts’ Expanded Learning Time
Initiative) and initiatives (Oklahoma City’s move to a continuous school year)
that have successfully upped hours of student learning. There’s a lot here. But
the most useful section offers cost-effective strategies to retain and expand
learning time and shows where these strategies are already working. Among them:
Stagger staff schedules, use technology as a teaching tool, free schools from
restrictive CBAs, and increase class sizes. (For more on each of these, I recommend our Stretching
the School Dollar
volume.) The report has an obvious agenda
and distinct message. But, given the short-sighted
and irresponsible
cuts
to learning time that are all-too-common in states and districts at
present, it’s one that is worth heeding.

Click to play

Click to listen to commentary on the loss of school time in CA from the Education Gadfly Show podcast

 

National Center on Time and Learning and
Education Commission of the States, “Learning Time in
America: Trends to Reform the American School Calendar: A Snapshot of Federal,
State, and Local Action
,” (Boston, MA: National
Center on Time and Learning; Denver, CO: Education Commission of the States, Summer 2011).

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