The Education Gadfly Show

Fresh off his South American adventure (seriously!), Rick reunites with Mike to catch up on what he missed: NCLB reauthorization, tough talk in New York, and the fall of Tim Tebow. Amber explains why the latest value-added study really is a big deal and Chris describes a teacher scandal that really will leave you asking, “What’s up with that?”
This week on the podcast, Janie explains why she wouldn’t want to head a school, Mike breaks down the latest NCLB proposal, and your hosts discuss how much online learning really costs. Amber explains the fuss around the Gates Foundation’s latest study, and Chris wonders what’s wrong with Tebowing.
The podcast kicks off the new year in style, with special guest commentary from Diane Ravitch on what 2012 will bring. Amber sees charter-school closures as a glass half empty and Chris loves up some celebrations.
This last 2011 installment of the Gadfly Show won’t disappoint, with Mike joined by Chris Tessone (formerly of Dollars and Sen$e fame). The two reflect on the past year in education reform before getting serious about charters, special education, and the achievement-gap truth. Amber splashes cold water on the teacher-residency model and Chris Irvine sees Santa-red.
Mike and Daniela go edu-meta, asking whether the accountability era has run its course, what the role of for-profits are in digital education, and how state-run districts and schools may reshape governance. Amber investigates the science “proficiency illusion” and Chris channels the Grinch.
Mike and Rick wax political, and then dig deep on Maryland?s Race to the Top grant, online credit recovery programs, and the downward slope of American educational attainment. Amber dazzles with a review of education-related census data and Chris disproves the old adage that quality trumps quantity.
Mike and Rick are finally back in the studio together this week as they discuss Diane Ravitch's use of NAEP data to raise doubts about charters, Rick and Checker's piece on stimulus funding, and new charter changes in Massachusetts. Then Amber tells us about a new National Bureau of Economic Research evaluation of the Harlem Children's Zone and Rate that Reform bans texting while driving.
Mike and Rick are manifestoed out, and instead talk shop on election implications, campaign contributions, and color-blind admissions. Amber jazzes up the pension reform debate, and Chris asks which witch is which.
This week, Mike and Rick debate the finer points of Maine constitutional law, pontificate on why Baltimore's school leaders refuse to learn from success stories in their midst, and put under the microscope PEN's new report about public opinion of NCLB. Nelson Smith discusses National Charter Schools Week, and News of the Weird has a serious case of Stockholm syndrome. This ain't your father's 15-minute podcast!
Mike is back but, alas, without any Argentinean headphones. This week, he and Rick discuss the troubles with teaching ELL students, the strength (or lack thereof) of federal levers in education, and KIPP's flirtation with turnaround schools in Philadelphia. Then Amber tells us about the effectiveness of educational software and Rate that Reform reviews Ebay basics.

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