Additional Topics

  1. Editors at the Dispatch opined on the need to fix charter school law in Ohio – now. Due is given to the recent CREDO and Bellwether reports on the charter school sector in Ohio, to Fordham’s role in getting those reports done and out in the world, and to Governor Kasich’s pledge to make change happen next year. Now the hard work begins.  (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  2. Lots of Ohio news outlets are looking back on the 130th General Assembly now that it is over; mostly in large-scale wrap up pieces. Journalist Ben Lanka however is focused specifically on the legislative challenge to Ohio’s Learning Standards (including Common Core). Chad is quoted in this story, which notes the failure to repeal Ohio’s Learning Standards this time around, and assuring us that the legislative fight isn’t over yet. (Cincinnati Enquirer)
     
  3. Like a fun-house-mirror image of item 1 above, editors in Youngstown opined on the need to fix charter school law in Ohio – now. However, there is no mention of the CREDO and Bellwether reports, the Vindy claims credit themselves for shining light on the need for action, and their suggestion for action is a bipartisan commission outside of elected officials. Weird. (Youngstown Vindicator)
     
  4. Like a mirror-image of item 2 above, the Dayton Daily News also talked about the fate of Common Core repeal legislation in the 130th General Assembly. They seem a lot more pessimistic about the effort’s ability to reconstitute next year, and about
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RANK CONFUSION
The Education Department unveiled its new college ranking system designed to keep higher education institutions accountable for performance on “key indicators.” The administration will look at factors such as expansion of college access to disadvantaged groups, net price and available scholarships, and graduation rates. University presidents and chancellors, however, say the rating system does a poor job of measuring metrics that truly matter, such as relationships with professors and campus culture.

EASY GRADERS
Governor Cuomo continues to anger New York teachers unions with his reform agenda. Cuomo expressed his desire to expand charters and alter teacher dismissal procedures in a letter to John King, New York’s outgoing education commissioner. The governor specifically took issue with the fact that recent teacher assessments classified only 1 percent of the state’s teachers as ineffective.

TIP #1: DON’T DISCLOSE THE DETAILS OF ANY UNSOLVED CRIMES
Just in time for all those last-minute revisions at the December 31 deadline, the Answer Sheet blog has a useful guide to aceing your college application essay. Among their expert pointers: Stick to a clear message, don’t get too cheeky, and abide by word limits. Notably, they offer no guidance on whether to compose your heartfelt work in Comic Sans.

WEEKEND LONG READ
While savoring your Sunday cantaloupe, take some time to enjoy the latest entry of “A Promise to Renew,” the Hechinger Report’s epic, award-winning series on Newark’s Quitman Street Renew School. In turnaround since 2012,...

Just when we thought the week couldn’t get any better, Governor John Kasich gave all of Ohio’s   education reform groups an early Christmas present, pledging to “fix the lack of regulation on charter schools.” Nice! There was quite a bit of coverage of this pledge across the state, in three distinct flavors:

  1. First were the reports that explicitly linked Kasich’s comments to the two reports (CREDO and Bellwether) which Fordham commissioned and released in the last two weeks. Best examples are Gongwer Ohio, the Columbus Dispatch (who first broke the story), and the Cincinnati Enquirer. The latter piece also ran in other outlets in their network. 
     
  2. Next up are the folks who trumpet the good news from the governor and reference “recent reports” without talking directly about Fordham. These are the Cleveland Plain Dealer (not namechecking CREDO or Bellwether either for that matter) and the Canton Repository. But good news is good news, so let’s not quibble.
     
  3. And then there’s the Youngstown Vindicator, whose version of the story is a) self-contained and b) devoid of mention of any catalyzing event. You know what? We’ll take that too.
     
  4. The Beacon Journal was conspicuously silent on the governor’s comments yesterday – about charter schools or anything else. What were they talking about instead? A “mass exodus” of teachers in Ohio due to changes in pension rules a couple of years back.  It’s an
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EGGHEADS IN ONE BASKET
For high schoolers with their eyes set on the Ivy League, piling on extracurriculars, volunteer hours, and APs may seem like a necessary evil. These days, the competition to get through the eye of the admissions needle is nearly insurmountable, and many of the brightest, most overscheduled kids are being waitlisted. A recent article has some advice for these young hopefuls: Instead of spending all your time juggling, put your energy into one master project. In other words, now would be a good time to unearth those plans to start a nonprofit sending iPads to Sudan.

NOW IF YOU'LL EXCUSE ME, I NEED TO GO SEE A MAN ABOUT A CAMPAIGN JET
In a statement earlier this week, Scott Walker walked back some of his strong opposition to the Common Core. The Wisconsin governor went from supporting a repeal-and-replace agenda to allowing schools that might wish to use standards to continue doing so. Furthermore, in response to Jeb Bush’s presidential non-announcement, Walker claimed that he would not let the former Florida governor’s decision affect his own and that he would like to “do more with education reform, entitlement reform, and tax reform,” while serving the people of Wisconsin.

ORDER WITHOUT CASUALTIES
NPR has a terrific, granular look at one school’s application of what is being called “restorative justice.” The approach seeks to minimize the use of suspensions and expulsions as a punishment for disruptive behavior—punishments that have been...

Jack Schneider

Editor's note: This post is the fifth entry of a multi-part series of interviews featuring Fordham's own Andy Smarick and Jack Schneider, an assistant professor of education at Holy Cross. It originally appeared in a slightly different form at Education Week's K-12 Schools: Beyond the Rhetoric blog. Earlier entries can be found herehere, here, and here.

Smarick: For several decades some education advocates (including teachers’ unions), after failing to win in legislatures, have successfully used state courts to achieve one of their top priorities: increasing K–12 funding. In a historical twist, some in the reform community, unable to win in legislatures, are now using state courts to overturn tenure rules.

Regardless of your views on any specific policy matter, what do you think of the general strategy of using courts instead of the elected branches to achieve K–12 policy goals? More specifically, what do you think of the Vergara decision, which overturned California's laws on seniority and tenure?

Schneider: It's a good question. Because this is an issue around which there's a lot of philosophical yoga. Liberals and conservatives alike bend themselves into all kinds of positions—advocating judicial restraint and judicial activism—depending on whether they like the outcome of a case.

Frankly, I see no problem with using the courts if the elected branches fail to act. The desegregation cases of the 1950s and 1960s are a great example of this. States and school districts were in violation of the law, and the courts—the Supreme Court as well as lower courts—stepped in to...

  1. I guess every day of news clips can’t focus on Fordham. *Sigh* The folks at StateImpact took a look at Innovation Ohio’s latest report on charter school funding, which was released the same day as our Bellwether report. In fact, that report is mentioned obliquely here, along with the CREDO report on Ohio charter school performance released last week. (And not in a nice way, but what’s new?) The usual “us vs. them” rhetoric is trotted out in this brief story, but it ends on a positive note: charter opponents “want state lawmakers to take up the school funding issue during the next session.” We’re with you. Let’s do it. (StateImpact Ohio)
     
  2. The 130th Ohio General Assembly has pretty much ridden off into the sunset, but not before a final flurry of lame duck legislation as the night was falling yesterday. And it’s fascinating what can find its way into bills in the twilight hours. To wit: a provision added to HB178 allows, for the first time, certain students eligible for the Cleveland Scholarship Program to use their vouchers in a private school just outside the city limits of Cleveland. We applaud this small but significant move and are glad that these few Cleveland families are truly able to choose the school they want for their children, regardless of geographic boundaries. How about we blow that up big and allow it for everyone? (Gongwer Ohio)
     
  3. During the debate around possible elimination Ohio’s so-called “5 of 8”
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  • Will an end to the annual testing mandates be the defining feature of a reauthorized No Child Left Behind Act? Education Week’s Alyson Klein reports a draft bill circulating among Senate GOP aides would leave testing schedules up to the states—no more mandatory reading and math tests in grades 3–8. Someone should remind the GOP that annual testing made clear that every student in every grade matters. Oh, wait. We did that.
  • They won’t have John King to kick around anymore. New York’s education chief is stepping down to become a senior adviser to Arne Duncan. More than “inspirational,” the adjective “embattled” had become a more common frozen epithet attached to King, who presided over the rollout of Common Core and pushed for strong teacher evaluations. In doing so, he ran afoul of the state’s teachers unions and anti-reform activists, who accused him of not listening even while jeering and shouting down the dignified King at series of public forums last year. He will be missed. 
  • ProPublica ran a piece blowing the whistle on “sweeps contracts,” wherein non-profit charter schools funnel nearly all their public dollars into the coffers of for-profit management companies. Potentially alarming, but This Week in Education blogger Alexander Russo rightly noted the ProPublica piece offered no clue on just how widespread the practice is. “A NACSA staffer tells me that there's no national data but that these situations aren't rare,” Russo writes.

This study in the Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis Journal examines the role of the school environment in relation to teacher effectiveness over time. On average, we know that teachers tend to make rapid gains in effectiveness in their early years—and that this growth rate tapers off with additional experience. But this finding is too broad. Thus, analysts explored the differences that exist across individual teachers working in different schools to uncover the role that school culture might play in their varied effectiveness over time. They use administrative records from third to eighth grade for years 2000–2010 in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools, which include more than 280,000 student records and roughly 3,200 teachers. They combine these data with responses from a state teacher survey that gauges working conditions, such as whether the school is safe, orderly, and characterized by mutual trust and respect; whether teachers collaborate on teaching practices; whether the principal supports teachers; and so on. After controlling for numerous student-, peer-, school-, and teacher-level variables, analysts find that the variation in returns to teaching experience is explained in part by differences in schools’ professional environments. Findings show that working in a more supportive environment is related to improvement that actually accumulates throughout the first ten years of a teacher’s career. (The gift that keeps on giving!) Specifically, after ten years, teachers working at a school with a more supportive environment moved up in the distribution of overall teacher effectiveness by roughly one-fifth of a standard deviation more than teachers...

With the fiftieth anniversary at hand for the celebrated and once-controversial "Moynihan Report," the late Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan is back on people's minds and keyboards. There will be more of this attention as 2015 unfolds. But Pat Moynihan is seldom off my mind, as he was primus-inter-pares of the mentors who mattered in my life and career, as well as my primary boss in three different settings between 1969 and 1981 (not to mention my doctoral advisor). My first "grown-up" job at his side—if age twenty-five counts as grown-up—was as a junior White House education aide at the start of the Nixon administration. (My version of this tale is recounted in the early chapters of Troublemaker, if you're a real glutton for punishment.) Pat was an assistant to the president for urban affairs, with an office in the West Wing not far from Kissinger's. The other room in his cramped basement suite was occupied by his chief deputy, Steve Hess (who for most of the time since has been an exceptionally prolific senior fellow at Brookings and one of Washington's true "wise men"—as well as a member of the vanishing species known as "moderate Republicans”). Steve has now written, and Brookings has just published, a thoroughly delightful account of the eventful first year of the Nixon-Moynihan relationship, which was unlikely from the outset, but rapidly proved to be both mutually beneficial and highly productive. ...

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