Additional Topics

  1. Back-to-school time is usually one of hope and possibility, but registration problems in Mansfield schools are causing dozens of students to simply sit and wait to start and parents and guardians to worry about lost time. The implication is that parents/grandparents haven’t done what is required in a timely fashion to register their mobile students – closed charter schools, other districts, etc. – but I can only imagine that the finger-pointing from the district is counter-productive. Suggestion to administrators: start school a day early next year for new kids only. (Mansfield News Journal)
     
  2. Kelli Young takes a look at the history of Stark County’s school districts and their boundaries, and gives us a fascinating piece about the way decisions from decades ago affect student assignments, taxes, transportation decisions, and governance across municipal and county lines today. There is little appetite among the Stark County ESC board to further consolidate, it seems, but Young at least asks the questions that many Stark County parents are asking. (Canton Repository)
     
  3. I missed this editorial from Akron over the weekend. Here it is. But seriously, how many more ways can folks opine in favor of Common Core? I assume we’ll find out this week. (Akron Beacon Journal)
     
  4. A Summit County charter school has been pro-active in creating an assessment and reporting mechanism for teachers and parents of students entering Kindergarten throughout the county this year. There are high hopes that such information will help ease the transition
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  1. State Sen. Peggy Lehner was the headliner at a City Club of Cleveland event on Friday, talking about the state ofK-12 education in Ohio and about ways to improve it. As you can imagine, the Common Core repeal effort underway in Ohio was a prime topic ("This legislation would create chaos in our schools and set us back years."), but the Senate Education Committee Chair also talked about Pre-K, third grade reading, teacher quality, and expulsion policies. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  2. Editors in Canton seem to be on board with the senator’s interests also, opining this weekend in praise of Stark County schools’ efforts to meet the requirements of the Third Grade Reading Guarantee. (Canton Repository)
     
  3. Common Core was also in the Canton paper this weekend. A quick survey of district and ESC officials (and at least one legislator) in Stark County shows broad support for the Common Core. (Canton Repository)
     
  4. Here’s a very thorough report on Common Core with a national take, an Ohio take, and a Cincinnati-centric take (the latter provided by the awesome Julia Carr Smyth). The implication of this piece is that Ohio’s legislature is having “buyer’s remorse” over the standards, but surely this would mean that the legislators on the Rules Committee paid attention when the standards were adopted back in 2010, which we heard last week was not the case. (WCPO-TV, Cincinnati)
     
  5. The Dayton Daily News focused their Common Core coverage on last week’s hearings, drawing
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  1. Lawyers are now involved in the kerfuffle between Portage County ESC and the Ohio Department of Education. So far it sounds mostly like trading barbs in the media, but I’m sure we’ll get to the heart of the matter soon enough: bad charter school authorization practices must end. (Gongwer Ohio)
     
  2. It’s been a bad PR week for Education Service Centers in Ohio. As a result, the awesome Jennifer Smith Richards is digging in to the structure, funding, and function of these public entities. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  3. Perhaps this story highlighting the “constant tension throughout the district” explains the need for “intestinal fortitude” in Youngstown we mentioned earlier this week. A report issued this week says Youngstown school board members need more training as to the proper roles of an elected board, because they are bogged down in day-to-day operations issues. An eye-opening read indeed. (Youngstown Vindicator)
     
  4. Speaking of Y’town, State Superintendent Dick Ross was briefly the chair of the Youngstown Academic Distress Commission before state government called. Four years later, and from the perspective of the superintendency, he is not satisfied with progress made by the district. Seems like a theme. (Youngstown Vindicator)
     
  5. Superintendent Ross visited two districts in Stark County this week, taking a first-hand look at technology integration in schools that won Straight-A grants and talking about the importance of third grade reading in rural schools. (Canton Repository)
     
  6. We’ll end today with a head scratcher. Pursuant to the Education
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  1. Week Two, Day Two of Common Core repeal hearings was a late one. As predicted, coverage is waning as the hearings go on…unless you follow Chad on Twitter. All of today’s pieces focus on the high-caliber business leaders who testified in favor of Common Core yesterday. Coverage in Cleveland not only addressed the important testimony of Cleveland Partnership’s Joe Roman but also that of CMSD CEO Eric Gordon and Breakthrough’s Alan Rosskamm. Cleveland has had its say. (Cleveland Plain Dealer) Gongwer’s coverage remains thorough, discussing the questions asked by legislators as well as the testimony written and given. (Gongwer Ohio) The Big D, interestingly, also focuses on some of the folks who haven’t testified, including ODE. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  2. Speaking of ODE, news broke yesterday that the department has referred the Portage County ESC’s top two leaders for investigation, saying the agency attempted to open a new charter school in Cincinnati after being warned not to due to unsatisfactory vetting processes. You can check out the just-the-facts version from the Statehouse perspective here. (Gongwer Ohio) The view from Northeast Ohio, where the ESC is located, focuses on the status of PCESC having “the second-worst academic record of all state sponsors”. (Cleveland Plain Dealer) Let us note that the proposed school in question was the one we told you about two weeks ago, which appeared to be attempting to capitalize on the closure of VLT Academy. That is the focus of the coverage in Southwest Ohio,
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Education-policy wonks should take a long look at The Long Shadow, a book based on a twenty-five-year study by Johns Hopkins University researchers. Following 790 Baltimore first-graders in 1982 until their late twenties, this book offers a rich research account of what policy analysts across fields have long tried to figure out: How can low-income children rise out of poverty and into the middle class? The sobering answer is they don’t. Kids born into poor families grew up to be poor themselves. Nearly half of the children in the study had the same income status as their parents; and only thirty-three children of families in the lowest-income bracket moved to a high-income bracket by their twenties. The education picture isn’t any sunnier. A mere 4 percent of those from low-income families had a college degree at twenty-eight (compared to 45 percent of their higher-income peers). The long shadow of poverty stretches further for African Americans: 40 percent of blacks who dropped out of high school were now working, compared to 89 percent of white high school dropouts. Women fared worse than men. Black and white women both earned less than their male counterparts, but white women tended to be better off financially with the benefit of marriage or a live-in partner. Black women earned less than white women and were less likely to be in stable relationships. The reading is sobering because the data is stark. Education reformers should take heed that family socio-economic status—at least today—matters more than educational...

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Last week, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan declared that states with NCLB waivers could wait until the 2015–16 school year to start tying test scores to teacher evaluations. It’s a very welcome bit of reasonableness, widely heralded, that grants overwhelmed states a reprieve and allows steadfast locales to stay the course. Effective implementation of the new Common Core standards is Job One—this is a time to support teachers as they stretch themselves and their students to meet the new, higher expectations. The Secretary’s decision will help.

On Thursday, a North Carolina trial court judge held unconstitutional a state voucher law that allowed public money to pay tuition at private and religious schools. The decision is frustrating for choice proponents—and not just because it leaves hundreds of families in last-minute limbo. Nevertheless, some light shines through. The ruling was based on the lack of regulation and accountability at these schools. Pass a provision requiring them to test kids and report the results, and the legal reasoning disappears. There’s also the imminent appeal.

New York City’s United Federation of Teachers supported a Saturday march against aggressive policing, pitting one city union against another and angering many teachers in the process. It also quite possibly injured their right to free speech. Teachers in NYC can choose not to be a member and avoid dues, but everyone still has to pay agency fees. This means that all teachers support union activities, including political speech...

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  1. Week Two of Common Core hearings got underway yesterday here in Ohio, with testimony focused in support of Ohio’s current standards and opposing HB597 seeking to repeal them. Here is a sampling of coverage: Gongwer’s coverage of testimony is not as thorough as Chad’s Twitter-mania, but very good nonetheless, focusing on the testimony of folks in-the-know on how the Common Core was created and adopted in Ohio. (Gongwer Ohio) Marc Kovac focuses on the testimony of school officials from around the state urging Ohio to stay the course on Common Core. (Youngstown Vindicator) I’m not sure how many more ways there are to opine in favor of Common Core, but editors in Cleveland continue to do so. (Cleveland Plain Dealer) Public media reporter Andy Chow notes that those in-the-know folks were here specifically to rebut misinformation given in earlier testimony. (StateImpact Ohio) Ever the political animals, Gongwer decided to ask the repeal sponsors how they rate their chances of passage. I can’t tell if the answer is optimistic or simply dogged. (Gongwer Ohio) Meanwhile, the Granville Schools board of education passed a resolution on Monday opposing the repeal of Ohio’s New Learning Standards, not only because it torches Common Core but also because it would require a rewrite of all other Ohio standards as well. (Newark Advocate)
     
  2. On to far more important matters, there is a class action lawsuit underway challenging the "adequacy of special education funding" in Ohio. The Advocate reports that
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  1. It’s a bit harder to be optimistic today than it was yesterday, since Reynoldsburg Schools has filed an unfair-labor complaint against the local teachers union. It may be tit-for-tat, but will that really help reach a successful conclusion to negotiations? (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  2. On a brighter note, first round Straight A Funds are already hard at work in 27 districts in Appalachia, providing additional paths to dual enrollment and college credit for high schoolers. (Gongwer Ohio)
     
  3. State Superintendent Dick Ross speaks highly of the Straight A Fund in the article above and of the innovation it is fostering in schools across Ohio. Yesterday, Superintendent Ross was in Toledo to tout the early promise shown by the Third Grade Reading Guarantee as well, especially in combatting dropout. (Toledo Blade)
     
  4. Why yes, there is a statewide race for auditor going on in Ohio. Why do you ask? Probably because the two campaigns traded barbs over funding for charter schools yesterday. (Youngstown Vindicator)
     
  5. Speaking of politics and Youngstown, editors at the Vindy opine on the new legislative assault on Ohio’s New Learning Standards and mince no words. The effort is “fueled by politics” and HB597 should “die on the legislative vine”. Yowza. (Youngstown Vindicator)
     
  6. Cleveland Metropolitan School District’s student enrollment is down from the previous year, but by less than officials predicted. That’s likely good news, but definitely troubling is the fact that only 87% of students registered have so far showed up
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  1. I’m going to start today with some tiny rays of sunshine. The headline of this story gives you all the background: data scrubbing in Columbus City Schools has now been proven to have kept hundreds of children from being eligible for vouchers for the last several years. Wait, you say, that doesn’t sound like sunshine. What IS sunshine is that everyone – and I mean everyone – wants to fix this problem for families…if they can figure out how. “Whether you agree with vouchers or not, the fact is, it is law right now, and everyone should have equal access with the right criteria,” says Democratic state rep. Kevin Boyce. “That wasn’t the case, so folks were cheated out of it. I’d like to find a way to correct that.” This is a sea-change in attitude, putting students and families first and setting politics aside for just a few moments. I am hopeful that with bipartisan support from city hall to the school board to the statehouse, help can be found to get vouchers to families who should have had them all along. Fantastic. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  2. I am perhaps less optimistic that whoever allowed that “scab” headline to be published in the Reynoldsburg News last week has changed her or his tune, but I am happy to say that the most recent update on the story is both calmer and more thorough, noting clearly that some significant progress was made in previous negotiations between teachers and administration.
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  1. Chad and Fordham are namechecked in an editorial from Cleveland, opining on the status of CMSD’s academic and organizational improvement efforts and what is still to be done. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  2. There is mention in that PD editorial of the district’s third grade reading results this year. Editors there, and in Columbus as well, raise concerns over the use of alternative tests to potentially boost passing rates. Honestly, it’s the editor’s final thought that resonates most with me: “Those strenuous efforts should be the new normal.” It’s more about the work ahead of those tests than the tests themselves. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  3. We told you a couple of months ago about a plan to outsource the placement of substitute teachers as needed this year in Dayton City Schools. Perhaps it was just a negotiating tactic – who knows anymore? – but that plan has been shelved in favor of retaining the services of local union substitutes. There are some caveats, some strict new service goals that must be met, and dental insurance is out the window, but I’m sure everyone is happy with the situation. Hmmm…. Where’s the emoticon for “dripping sarcasm”? (Dayton Daily News)
     
  4. Back in November during our first round of Common Core repeal hearings in Ohio, it was stated in testimony by CCSS opponents that “no one knows who their state school board member is”, despite the fact that every region of the state has to vote on one every four years.
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