Additional Topics

Curator’s Note: Gadfly Bites will be off tomorrow, returning on March 13 to begin a new Monday, Wednesday, Friday publication schedule.

  1. Nicely-detailed discussion of various “safe harbor” provisions – those already in place, those currently being debated, and those still being drafted – for Ohio teachers in relation to students’ standardized test scores. Journalist Jeremy Kelley attended Fordham’s Speakers Series event on teacher evaluations and includes a number of comments from panelists Melissa Cropper (Ohio Federation of Teacherst) and Matt Verber (Students First Ohio) from that discussion in his piece. Thanks for coming, Jeremy. (Springfield News Sun)
     
  2. Kudos to Cleveland’s Breakthrough Schools for their recent award of a $1 million grant from the Haslam family’s 3 Foundation. "They're making great strides and they're making it quickly," said Dee Haslam in announcing the award. “We really like to help those organizations that are making a difference." Nice. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  3. Speaking of Breakthrough Schools, it was announced this week that Breakthrough and Cleveland Municipal School District have reached an agreement on new building leases for three charter schools in the network, including an extension of the first-of-its-kind-in-Ohio arrangement of a charter school sharing space with a
  4. ...
  1. More witnesses testified on HB 2 (the standalone charter law reform bill) yesterday. More witnesses, more charter reforms proposed. It’s a bandwagon! (Gongwer Ohio)
     
  2. But perhaps that bandwagon is getting a little overloaded? The Dispatch coverage of yesterday’s testimony leads with the detail that introduction of a substitute version of the bill – incorporating some amount of additional/replacement provisions based on testimony given so far – will be delayed 7 to 10 days from original plans. Sing along if you know the words: I’m just a bill, yes I’m only a bill…. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  3. One of witnesses whose testimony on HB 2 probably had the most impact (at least let’s hope so) was State Auditor Dave Yost. Today, Yost has a detailed, thoughtful, and important opinion column in the Dispatch. In it he amplifies – and simplifies – his recent detailed testimony, focusing on reforms that would improve the efficiency, transparency, and quality of most any public/private hybrid entity, of which charter schools are just one example. Fascinating. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  4. The K-12 education portion of the state budget bill also had a hearing yesterday. Among other provisions hearing testimony, a proposed increase to
  5. ...

It’s been a great year for the Buckeye State. LeBron is back—and the Cavs are rolling into the playoffs. The Ohio State University knocked off the Ducks in the national championship, the economy is heating up, and heck, state government actually has more than eighty-nine cents in its rainy day fund.

But if you’ve been following the education headlines, you might feel a little down. The fight over Common Core and assessments continues to be bruising. Legislators are seriously scrutinizing the state’s problematic charter school law. Various scandals continue to plague local schools, and we’re not that far removed from the meltdown in Columbus City Schools. To shake off the wintertime education blues, I offer my list of the top five most exciting things happening in Ohio education today.

1. Four for Four Schools

In 2013–14, forty Ohio schools made a clean sweep on the four value-added components of the state’s school report cards, receiving an A on each one. This is an impressive feat. These schools had to demonstrate significant contributions not only to overall student growth, but also for their special needs, gifted, and low-achieving students. (Starting two years ago, Ohio began to rate schools on an...

Not much in the way of fireworks, but rather many points of agreement emerged during last week’s Education Speakers Series event on teacher evaluations. Ohio Federation of Teachers President Melissa Cropper and Students First Ohio’s State Policy Director Matt Verber began at the same point: teachers are the most-important in-school factor in student achievement. But when, how, and how much teachers should be evaluated were all matters of discussion. Both panelists felt there were questions to be resolved about the possible use of “shared attribution” for evaluating teachers. The question of whether student surveys should be used in evaluations generated no consensus. And the question of how evaluation data should be used – development vs. removal – proved a predictable bone of contention.

We appreciate the time and contribution of both our panelists in this important discussion, and thank our audience for their valuable questions and comments. If you missed the event, check out the full video:

 

And look for future events in our Education Speakers Series coming soon. Anything you want to see? Drop us a line: jmurray@edexcellence.net. ...

Cheers to State Auditor Dave Yost, for going there. Charter law reform is a cause célèbre in Ohio. An influential report, a determined governor, and two bills being heard in House committees all feature excellent reform provisions, mostly in the “sponsor-centric” realm. But last week, Yost laid out some reform provisions that only an auditor would think of—things like accounting practice changes, attendance reporting changes, and defining the public/private divide inherent in many charter schools’ operations. These are all welcome additions to the ongoing debate from an arm of state government directly concerned with auditing charter schools.

Jeers to Mansfield City Schools, for nitpicking Yost and his team as they attempt to help the district avert fiscal disaster. Mansfield has been in fiscal emergency for over a year, and their finances are under the aegis of a state oversight committee. Yost’s team identified $4.7 million in annual savings opportunities. Instead of getting to work on implementing as many of those changes as possible, district administrators last week decided to pick holes in the methodology and timing of the report. Kind of like the teenager who swears “I’m going” just as Dad finally loses his cool. And the fiscal...

  1. Chad is quoted in the Columbus Dispatch’s big weekend gotcha story about the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow (ECOT), a statewide online charter school that spends somewhere around 2 percent of its budget on advertising. It is that advertising that is the sticking point here, with some odd comparisons made to Columbus City Schools’ designated “recruitment” spending. The full Dispatch story is here. The story also hit the AP wire in various non-Columbus-centric versions and so that same headline popped up in media outlets across the state. Some – like this one from the Toledo Blade – include some edited input from Chad. Other versions do not.
     
  2. Q: When do you know a teacher’s union actually approves of a charter school? A: When they actively try to unionize it. “We are careful about where we look to organize,” OFT President Melissa Cropper says. “Although we believe that all teachers should have the right to organize if they so desire, we don’t feel right in organizing teachers in a school we are trying to shut down.” There are a lot of interesting details in here – from teachers, the union, and school leaders. Worth a read. (Akron Beacon
  3. ...
  1. There was a full day of hearings on Governor Kasich’s proposed budget yesterday in the House Finance and Appropriations Committee’s Primary and Secondary Education Subcommittee. Not sure if it was opponent testimony or just what they call “interested party” testimony, but everyone quoted in these two stories seemed pretty negative. First up, lots of union reps who a) didn’t like the funding formula changes proposed, and b) want many additional aspects of the bill (charter law reforms, increases in voucher amounts, testing changes, etc.) stripped out in favor of standalone legislation on these issues. You can read coverage of this testimony on Gongwer Ohio. On the topic of the funding formula, union friend Howard Fleeter did most of the talking. He’s not a fan. But neither he nor the other witnesses had much concrete to offer as an alternative. Said the subcommittee chair: “Every [potential formula] you look at has its own flaws.”  Coverage of Fleeter’s testimony is in the Columbus Dispatch.
     
  2. Speaking of Kasich, he was quoted on the record yesterday in regard to the tempest in a teacup that is parents opting their children out of standardized testing. What’s he got to say? Ohio
  3. ...

It seems there are only two education topics worth talking about in Ohio today. Good thing there are a number of perspectives on both.

  1. First up, charter law reform. So far, a standalone bill and the governor’s budget bill are being heard in their respective House committees and both contain excellent reform provisions, mostly in the “sponsor-centric” realm. A standalone Senate bill with other proposals will likely follow. But yesterday, as promised, State Auditor Dave Yost testified on the House bill and laid out some reform provisions that only an auditor would think of. Things like accounting practice changes, attendance reporting changes, defining the public/private divide inherent in many charter schools’ operations, and some interesting new ideas around truancy reporting. These are all welcome additions to the ongoing debate from a part of state government directly connected with oversight of charter schools, sponsors, boards, and school management organizations. You can read details of his proposals and testimony in the Columbus Dispatch, the Cleveland Plain Dealer, the Dayton Daily News (including input from our own Aaron Churchill), and Gongwer Ohio, among other outlets.
     
  2. Hopefully our very knowledgeable auditor is exempt from the concerns raised in the
  3. ...

Florida—home to Disney World, sunny skies, and bizarre crimes—is probably best known for its sizable elderly population. Yet a new report from the state’s Foundation for Excellence in Education warns that we are all Florida, or will be soon enough. Dr. Matthew Ladner, who pens the report, predicts that by 2030, the demographics in most of the country will mirror those in today’s geriatric Sunshine State. And that doesn’t bode well for our nation’s fiscal health.

Seventy-six million Baby Boomers will soon leave the workforce. Growing along with this cohort—albeit at a lesser rate—is the school-aged population. As a result, the total percentage of young and old Americans dependent on government-financed education, healthcare, and Social Security will jump from 59 percent in 2010 to 76 percent in 2030.

Fortunately, just as readers might consider panicked calls to parents begging them to reconsider retirement, the report offers some hope. The future workers of America are in school at this very moment. Providing them with an excellent education is the best step towards building a large base of wage-earning, tax-paying citizens. According to Ladner, one of the most cost-effective ways to do this is to expand school choice. Charter and private...

This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of the Moynihan Report. The great tootling racket now bursting your eardrums is the trumpet blast of memorials, think-pieces, and reflections commemorating the occasion.

The report, which kicked up a generations-long debate on race and culture far afield from its technocratic origins, primarily concerned itself with the vanishing of two-parent families in the black community. That phenomenon is also the subject of this counterintuitive Education Next study. Its authors, however, have no need to limit their focus on a particular racial category, since single parenthood is now commonplace across multiple demographics. The proportion of white children raised by a single parent today (22 percent) is precisely the same as for black children in 1965. Meanwhile, the proportion of black children living in the same circumstances has continued to rise astonishingly, to 55 percent.

Contriving to measure the educational influence of these developments, the study analyzes data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), a broad-ranging sample of roughly 6,000 children who came of age between the late-1970s and the late-2000s. Their conclusion is both surprising and noteworthy: Measured against a number of other factors, including the age...

Pages