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Common Core, bad actors, public records, the MBR, and Head Start all feature in today's education news.

NYC’S SELECTIVE HIGH SCHOOL EXAM
Efforts by civil-rights advocates to allow New York City’s selective high schools to use multiple measures in admissions decisions have not gained political support. (New York Times)
 
NOLA’S CHARTERS
After Hurricane Katrina, the state-run Recovery School District (RSD) took over all of New Orleans’s schools but the best ones. And now, RSD charter schools are beginning to inch past those schools that were historically the top performers. (Hechinger Report)
 
PRIVATE-SCHOOL CHOICE
In the last eight days of the New York State Assembly’s legislative session, school-choice backers are making a final push to pass an education tax-credit bill. (Charters & Choice)
 
MUTUAL CONSENT IN COLORADO
A Colorado judge dismissed a union lawsuit that was intended to overturn a “mutual-consent” provision in the state’s teacher-effectiveness law. (Teacher Beat)
 
FORDHAM IN THE NEWS
Economist: “Zombieland
Wisconsin Public Radio: “Critics Of Common Core Standards Mobilize In Capitol For Hearings
 
START YOUR MORNING OFF RIGHT
Onion: “New Charter School Lottery System Gives Each Applicant White Pill, Enrolls Whoever Left Standing”...

From the State Board to the Statehouse; from Canton to Cleveland to Cincinnati; lots of important education news to cover today.

Ohio's report cards get a major approval from wonks and parents alike; blended learning still has a ways to go; voucher application boom; Fordham Ohio's newest staff member.

The Washington Post made a big splash this weekend with a long, thorough piece on Common Core adoption and implementation and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The Post calls the embrace of Common Core “one of the swiftest and most remarkable shifts in education policy in U.S. history” and attributes it to the philanthropy of the world’s wealthiest person. Perhaps this is the beginning of a trend—the media covering private giving to schools. The New York Times recently reported on the K–12 giving of the Walton Family Foundation.

Something big is afoot in the nation’s teacher unions. In state and local elections, members are choosing increasingly militant leaders. This might be what unions need to regain strength, or it could further isolate them. Either way, the path ahead is going to be bumpy for all involved. This piece, despite the crude analysis of the reform community, explains what’s happening and why.

I’ve spilled lots of ink trying to raise the alarm about Detroit’s schools. But a picture’s worth a thousand words, so take a quick spin through this tragic photo collection on the abandonment of the Motor City.

State takeovers of failing districts can pit two principles against each other—the need to intervene aggressively when low-income kids are being poorly served and the right of communities to shape the contours of their local schools. This short piece about Newark and Paterson, New Jersey—under state control for two decades apiece—describes the uncomfortable balance.

In my view, the education-reform community has spent too little energy trying to help rural schools. There are millions of low-income kids far outside of big cities, and unfortunately we’ve yet to develop policies and programs to address these needs. If...

Busy weekend for education news and opinion, especially in Ohio's big city papers.

PRE-K LOGISTICS
Less than half of the children seeking a free prekindergarten seat in New York City were assigned one in their top-choice public school next year, and around one-third weren’t assigned a seat at all. (New York Times)

BURIED IN PAPERWORK
Speaking from personal experience, a college student makes an appeal for better programs to help kids from immigrant and low-income families navigate the financial-aid process. (Hechinger Report)

ASSESSMENT UPDATE
By Education Week’s count, just 42 percent of U.S. K–12 students will take a Common Core–aligned assessment designed by PARCC or Smarter Balanced. (Curriculum Matters)

STUDENT-DATA CONTROVERSY
Policymakers have renewed a push to build a federal “unit record” database, originally proposed by the Bush administration and killed by privacy advocates, which would track students through college and into the workforce and would be administered by the U.S. Department of Education. (Inside Higher Ed)

ED TECH
While some district leaders are becoming savvier consumers of ed-tech products, many simply don’t understand the technology, hampering entrepreneurs from getting from “idea to selling.” (For more on ed tech, see Education Week’s special report on “Navigating the Ed-Tech Marketplace.”)

 

FORDHAM IN THE NEWS

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  1. Reporting continues across the state in regard to the K-12 education MBR bill and other education legislation moving through the General Assembly. The Vindy focuses its story on the creation of 3 paths to a diploma, emphasizing that legislative changes recognize one size doesn’t fit all when it comes to K-12. (Youngstown Vindicator)
     
  2. In the Dayton area, superintendents generally seem to like the new graduation options as well, although there are clearly a number of questions yet to be answered. The kid on the street appears to be split. (Dayton Daily News)
     
  3. StateImpact focuses on Ohio’s apparently staunch commitment to the Common Core. (StateImpact Ohio)
     
  4. Speaking of which, Rep. Gerald Stebelton is quoted in this public radio piece as saying, “As long as I’m the chairman of the House Education Committee, we're going to have Common Core.” But, of course, Stebelton is term-limited and will be out of office by the end of 2014. (WKSU Radio, Kent)
     
  5. And finally, the Dispatch reports on the legislation’s requirement that districts create parent panels to review/discuss/approve curriculum materials. The discussion in the online comments section is more substantive and interesting than usual.  (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  6. In other news, the PD took another look at NCTQ's teacher-absence report and this follow-up story suggests that CMSD’s large number of in-school-time training sessions could have led to a skewing of the number. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  7. As our last stop for the week, we look at the proposed, and very different, dispensation plans for two unused school buildings. In Newark, an empty downtown school building is to be part of the first historic preservation project in and around the central square and it’s going to be renovated into apartments. (Newark Advocate). In New Carlisle, a
  8. ...

Fordham Ohio draws on an experienced teacher to bolster its policy team.

Graduation requirement changes coming to Ohio tops the news today.

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