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A new study examines the effects of disruptive elementary school peers on other students’ high school test scores, college attendance, degree attainment, and early adult earnings.

Analysts link administrative and public records data for children enrolled in grades 3–5 in one large Florida county (Alachua) between the years of 1995–1996 and 2002–2003. The demographic and test score data are linked to domestic violence, which is the part of the study that strikes me as odd.

They define “disruptive peer” not by how many times a child is disciplined in school or the severity of the offense, but rather by a proxy—whether a member of the child’s family petitioned the court for a temporary restraining order against another member of the family. Apparently, the literature shows that children exposed to domestic violence are more likely to display a number of behavioral problems, among them aggression, bullying, and animal cruelty. Another study showed these students negatively affected their peers’ behavior. Nevertheless, calling these students “disruptive peers” is a misleading characterization given the lack of documented school infractions. They are kids exposed to domestic violence, and the findings should be understood within this light.

That said, here are the results: Estimates show that...

  1. Editors in Columbus opined this week in favor of a new bill that would prevent online schools from claiming credit for “education offered” vs. “education provided”. (Columbus Dispatch, 3/29/16) Editors in Youngstown opined similarly on the same topic. (Youngstown Vindicator, 3/30/16)
     
  2. Editors in Youngstown were busy this week, also issuing a wide-ranging opinion piece describing and despairing of the state of affairs with regard to the new Academic Distress Commission. However, I’m not sure you can blame the Youngstown Board of Education too much for looking for more meetings/more pay these days. As noted in previous editions of Gadfly Bites, everyone currently serving in Youngstown probably expected to either be out of a job or on very different footing in that job by now. With the protracted wheel-spinning related to the new ADC – and the dissolution of the old ADC, who handed down the fewer-meetings edict – everyone still standing is likely being asked to do much more than they thought they were going to be doing at this point in time. Just sayin’ that inaction has its consequences. (Youngstown Vindicator, 3/29/16).
     
  3. Lots of folks in the halls of power talking about the
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According to a recent report from the Education Trust, college completion rates for black students at four-year public institutions have increased. Of the 232 institutions that improved overall graduation rates from 2003 to 2013, nearly 70 percent increased graduation rates for black students. Almost half of these institutions (47 percent) also decreased gaps between black and white students. Unfortunately, that means that at 53 percent of institutions, the gains posted by black students failed to keep pace with those of white students, resulting in a wider college attainment gap. Even worse, nearly one-third of the institutions that improved overall student attainment exhibited graduation rates for black students that were actually flat or declining. The silver lining, however, is that there are institutions that can serve as a model for reversing these negative trends—and one of these exemplars is right here in Ohio.

At the Ohio State University in Columbus, graduation rates for black students are improving, and the gap between black and white graduation rates has decreased. Since 2003, Ohio State’s graduation rates for black students have improved by approximately thirty-one percentage points (from 41 percent in 2003 to over 72 percent in 2013), and the graduation...

  1. A little quiet today in terms of education news, but we’ll soldier on. No applications have yet been received for the permanent position of state superintendent here in Ohio, despite the efforts of a search firm. Deadline is April 8 and state board folks are confident that a slate of some kind will materialize by then. Columbus City Schools’ superintendent Dan Good does not want the job, which seems to be the actual point of this piece. (Columbus Dispatch, 3/27/16)
     
  2. Interim State Supe Dr. Lonny Rivera has said that he also doesn’t want the permanent job because he feels there is a lack of “civility” on the board. Harsh, especially since the dude might be an interim for a lot longer than he bargained for. But that perceived lack of civility is not unique to the state board. One elementary school aide in Gahanna-Jefferson City Schools is fighting a one-person crusade against incivility, improper fork usage, and Axe body spray via etiquette lessons. I could try to describe this for you in further detail, but I will instead direct you to the main image included
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  1. The most recent third grade reading scores across Ohio were released this week and the numbers got a lot of coverage across the state, including here in Central Ohio. It is reported that 89.5 percent of Columbus City Schools' third graders passed last year's test; not the worst in the county. (Columbus Dispatch, 3/24/16) In Northwest Ohio, Toledo City Schools had just shy of 72 percent of last year’s third graders pass the test, although with the allowed exemptions for special needs students and others, they say 95 percent of last year’s third graders were promoted to fourth grade. (Toledo Blade, 3/24/16) In Stark County, they are more interested in individuals than percentages, noting that 148 of last year’s third grade students in the county did not pass. (Canton Repository, 3/25/16) Note that the cut score for this year’s test rises again. That data has been promised in a more timely fashion.
     
  2. Free bachelors degrees from OSU will produce a raft of new preschool teachers in low-income Columbus neighborhoods. That’s the 50,000-foot view of this story from the D this week. Digging into the details yields some fine print and questions. The program is limited
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  1. Just some quick hits on today’s clips. Regular service will return on Friday. I promise. Our own Chad Aldis is quoted on one of two items in this piece on charter school news, glued together (almost) by the subject of e-schools. Chad is quoted in regard to a new report on charter school funding. Oranges and apples are referenced, but not necessarily in that order. (Columbus Dispatch, 3/22/16)
     
  2. A new national study identified schools across the country who have been successful and shrinking or closing the achievement gap between rich and poor students in their communities. In Columbus, that short list includes five charter schools, one of which is Fordham-sponsored Columbus Collegiate Academy – Main. We couldn’t be prouder of the great work of CCA’s staff, teachers, families, and students. (Columbus Dispatch, 3/23/16)
     
  3. No offence to Stephen Stohla, but I can only imagine he was figuring he would either be out of his current job or permanently into a very different version of this current job by now. Either way, due to the lack of clarity around the judicial definition of the word “teacher”, he is still in his temporary job as Interim Superintendent of Youngstown
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  1. Today’s clips are just catching up with news from late last week. The first charter school in Ohio with a unionized teaching force is one in the “I Can” network in Cleveland. I wonder if they’ll have to change the name? (Cleveland Plain Dealer, 3/16/16)
     
  2. School districts across the state learned last week that it is too late for them to switch from online back to paper test administration for the imminent round of spring testing. You can check out coverage from the D (Columbus Dispatch, 3/17/16) and the PD (Cleveland Plain Dealer, 3/17/16). Someone somewhere is contemplating the paradox of folks simultaneously wanting to regress to 20th century test administration processes AND wanting to invent time travel at the same moment. But not me.
     
  3. Speaking of time travel, it seems like a double dose of the butterfly effect might be in action in Cincinnati. Stay with me here, because my interpretation of this story is slightly different than that of the Enquirer. It definitely starts at a different point in time – circa 2005, when Cincinnati City Schools decided to close up a century-old school building in the Clifton neighborhood. It was too rundown
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On Wednesday, March 23, 2016, Fordham president Mike Petrilli will be in Columbus to discuss his new book, Education for Upward Mobility. In it, more than a dozen contributors work to answer fundamental questions: How can we help children born into poverty transcend their disadvantages and enter the middle class as adults? And in particular, what role can our schools play?

Mike will be presenting the answers he gleaned from work on the book and we will be convening a wide-ranging panel of Ohio stakeholders in education, human services, and government to respond to both the questions and the answers presented.

Wednesday, March 23

9:00 – 10:30 am

Chase Tower

100 E Broad Street

Sixth Floor - Conference Room B

Columbus, OH 43215

PANELISTS:

This report from Public Impact describes an unusual $55 million public-private school turnaround initiative in North Carolina’s Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools called Project L.I.F.T. (Leadership and Investment for Transformation). Despite its sizable price tag, the project offers lessons for funders, district leaders, and anyone else taking on the tough work of overhauling low-performing schools—as spelled out in this examination of outcomes at the project’s two-year midway point.

Launched in 2012–13, L.I.F.T. is an effort led (and largely funded by) a group of donors working in partnership with the district to raise the graduation rate at West Charlotte High School and improve performance at select feeder schools. The project’s initial investment group (led by local foundations) pledged $40.5 million to the effort during its planning phase; corporate sponsors, individual donors, and federal School Improvement Grants and Title 1 dollars have funded the rest. Project reforms center on four areas: time, talent, technology, and parent and community engagement. This has included implementing extended learning in select schools and opening a credit recovery high school, as well as issuing hiring bonuses, revamping the district’s hiring calendar, and implementing “Opportunity Culture”—an initiative through which teachers teach more students for more pay. Laptops have been subsidized...

Cincinnati voters will likely decide this fall on whether to approve a tax hike to expand pre-K. The Cincinnati Preschool Promise is the organization driving these efforts; if they get a thumbs-up from the electorate, the tentative plan is to provide families with a subsidy that covers the cost of two years of all-day preschool (full tuition for families up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level and partial tuition, on a sliding scale, for those with higher incomes). Only high-quality pre-K providers—those receiving at least a three-star rating on the state’s Step Up to Quality system—will be eligible to receive these public funds.

To help inform the debate as Election Day draws near, the Cincinnati Business Committee and United Way of Greater Cincinnati commissioned the RAND Corporation to review national research on the effectiveness of pre-K. The study doesn’t add any new evidence, but does provide an overview of the findings from fifteen evaluations of pre-K: One federal program (Head Start), eleven statewide programs (all non-Ohio), and three district-level programs (Boston, Chicago, and Tulsa). Broadly speaking, the authors paint an optimistic picture, highlighting the positive short-term effects of pre-K on kindergarten readiness and noting...

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