Additional Topics

  1. A couple of last week’s topics have continued in dicussion through the weekend. First up, NCTQ’s report on teacher absences. The Enquirer published a commentary pinning at least one third of teacher absences reported in that survey on "state mandates" and the training time required for teachers. Common Core, new Kindergarten assessments, OTES, third grade reading, and a number of other buzzwords are also blamed. (Cincinnati Enquirer)
     
  2. Next up, the Beacon Journal takes on the new “3 paths to graduation” set out by the education MBR; specifically, the path that gives $5 million to dropout recovery schools. There are tons of questions still to answer, but the ABJ seems staunchly opposed at this juncture. (Akron Beacon Journal)
     
  3. In other news, the only piece of Columbus’ failed reform levy from last fall to get a toehold into reality - $5 million for preschool programs – is moving forward already, but the preK plans appear to be baffling even folks on the inside. I have to ask: is this supposed to be education support or job support? And how on earth – and why on earth – is the program going to limit its support to folks
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PRE-K LOGISTICS
Less than half of the children seeking a free prekindergarten seat in New York City were assigned one in their top-choice public school next year, and around one-third weren’t assigned a seat at all. (New York Times)

BURIED IN PAPERWORK
Speaking from personal experience, a college student makes an appeal for better programs to help kids from immigrant and low-income families navigate the financial-aid process. (Hechinger Report)

ASSESSMENT UPDATE
By Education Week’s count, just 42 percent of U.S. K–12 students will take a Common Core–aligned assessment designed by PARCC or Smarter Balanced. (Curriculum Matters)

STUDENT-DATA CONTROVERSY
Policymakers have renewed a push to build a federal “unit record” database, originally proposed by the Bush administration and killed by privacy advocates, which would track students through college and into the workforce and would be administered by the U.S. Department of Education. (Inside Higher Ed)

ED TECH
While some district leaders are becoming savvier consumers of ed-tech products, many simply don’t understand the technology, hampering entrepreneurs from getting from “idea to selling.” (For more on ed tech, see Education Week’s special report on “Navigating the Ed-Tech Marketplace.”)

 

FORDHAM IN THE NEWS

  • Politico: “
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  1. Reporting continues across the state in regard to the K-12 education MBR bill and other education legislation moving through the General Assembly. The Vindy focuses its story on the creation of 3 paths to a diploma, emphasizing that legislative changes recognize one size doesn’t fit all when it comes to K-12. (Youngstown Vindicator)
     
  2. In the Dayton area, superintendents generally seem to like the new graduation options as well, although there are clearly a number of questions yet to be answered. The kid on the street appears to be split. (Dayton Daily News)
     
  3. StateImpact focuses on Ohio’s apparently staunch commitment to the Common Core. (StateImpact Ohio)
     
  4. Speaking of which, Rep. Gerald Stebelton is quoted in this public radio piece as saying, “As long as I’m the chairman of the House Education Committee, we're going to have Common Core.” But, of course, Stebelton is term-limited and will be out of office by the end of 2014. (WKSU Radio, Kent)
     
  5. And finally, the Dispatch reports on the legislation’s requirement that districts create parent panels to review/discuss/approve curriculum materials. The discussion in the online comments section is more substantive and interesting than usual.  (Columbus Dispatch)
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The Ohio Gadfly is extremely excited to announce an addition to our Columbus office. Jessica Poiner, a former teacher, has joined our team as an education policy analyst. For an introduction, here’s Jessica in her own words:

My name is Jessica Poiner. I’m the middle child in a family of three daughters, born and raised in Akron, Ohio. Most of my growing up took place in the suburb of Stow, where I spent a lot of time (probably too much time, if my three knee surgeries are any indication) playing soccer and reading anything I could get my hands on.

When I was in fourth grade, my teacher explained a fun new class activity that functioned something like a board game. Every student had a game piece, and we earned chances to roll the dice on Fridays based on our behavior and quiz scores. I have no idea what my peers thought of the game, but I do remember thinking that I couldn’t wait to be a teacher so that I could design cool games for my students.

Fast-forward to May of 2011. I’ve just graduated from Baldwin-Wallace University with a degree in English. I’ve loaded my...

  1. As expected, the Plain Dealer waited a day before reporting on the education MBR. Their focus is on the changes to testing and graduation requirements, something with which we are all grappling. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  2. There was an anti-Common Core rally at the Statehouse yesterday. Perhaps you felt the thunderous presence of the mighty crowd. No? Me neither. Didn’t get much press coverage either, although a couple papers picked up a brief story via AP. The jist: a Common Core repeal bill is sitting in the House Education Committee; the sponsor and the ralliers want to get enough representatives to sign a petition to force it out and onto the House floor. For the second day in a row, I’m forced to type the words “there’s no way this will ever be a Schoolhouse Rock song”.  (Ravenna Record-Courier)
     
  3. The headline writer at the Enquirer has taken a chill-pill and returned to Jack Webb Mode (just the facts) for this story about a new charter school which will be operated by Norwood Schools starting next fall. It is a very small blended-learning model housed in a district classroom with flexible hours and pacing. (Cincinnati Enquirer)
     
  4. It’s
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Six inches of squish

On this week's podcast: A lunch fight, a School Choice Ohio lawsuit, the DOE's My Brother's Keeper initiative, and Amber reviews NCTQ's Roll Call report.

Amber's Research Minute

Roll Call: The Importance of Teacher Attendance by Nithya Joseph, Nancy Waymack, and Daniel Zielaski, (Washington, D.C.: National Council on Teacher Quality, June 2014).
  1. The K-12 education MBR bill emerged from a conference committee yesterday, reconciling some thorny issues between House and Senate versions. Coverage varied around the state. In what reads more like a foaming-at-the-mouth editorial than impartial journalism, the Akron Beacon Journal focuses on a funding boost for dropout-recovery charter schools (or, as the ABJ puts it, “dropout producers”). The Columbus Dispatch focuses more dispassionately on the tweaks to teacher evaluations. Fascinating legislative process it seems, and clearly impervious to having a Schoolhouse Rock song made about it.
     
  2. Another item making statewide news today was NCTQ’s report on teacher absences, noting that Cleveland’s numbers are the worst of all 40 metro areas surveyed, and Columbus is second. The Cleveland Plain Dealer, as usual, digs deep to try and understand the numbers and to relate it to steps already being taken to address the situation, which has actually been on the union’s and CMSD’s radars since October. The Columbus Dispatch also talks to the local union boss about her members' attendance numbers – and she is interested to understand those numbers of course – without noting that said union boss has about 25 days left in the
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  1. The Cincinnati Enquirer has finally relented and covered School Choice Ohio's legal action against Cincinnati Public Schools in regard to student directory information. Sadly, the piece is a mess of misstated/omitted facts about EdChoice and includes some flawed conclusions because of it. Especially egregious is the omission of EdChoice eligibility for students in chronically underperforming schools regardless of income. The piece states, “A win by School Choice Ohio could lead to drastic enrollment drops at some schools.” Yes, indeed, if parents in perennially low-rated schools actually knew they had a private school option available to them and had someone to help them get more information, a number of them would likely leave. And that's a problem because why? (Cincinnati Enquirer)
  2. Teachers in Worthington City Schools have approved a new contract that contains some novel tweaks. The union’s leader trumpets a revised pay-for-experience schedule for veteran teachers entering the district, but as a Fordhamite I’ll highlight the clause which would deny a step increase to any teacher who receives a designation of “ineffective” on an evaluation. Which also begs a couple of questions in itself. (Columbus Dispatch)
  3. Summer school in Dayton Public Schools
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  1. So the education news was pretty thin on the ground around Ohio this weekend…unless you count graduation coverage. Here’s one of those graduation stories that caught my eye: remember the kerfuffle we reported back in January about one district high school wanting to hold its graduation ceremony in a church…as they had done for the previous two years? Due to parental concerns, it was back to the cramped, less-accessible civic center this year but the kerfuffle was pretty well forgotten amid the tears and joy. (Canton Repository)
  2. Another case in point: the Big D was so busy doing other things that they ran a reprint of an editorial from the Chicago Tribune this morning. It was opining strongly in favor of Common Core. (Columbus Dispatch)
  3. The Beacon Journal editors also opined this weekend, about how charter schools are failing dropouts and potential dropouts, following on from a similiar-sounding series of articles from last week. (Akron Beacon Journal)
  4. One journalist who was working hard this weekend was Casey Elliott of the Urbana Citizen. Casey went in-depth to look at PARCC pilot
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Former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg did more than give a terrific speech last week at the Harvard commencement; he delivered an eloquent, well-timed, and much-needed rejoinder to the national push—well, national but mainly on elite campuses—by students and faculty to ban or repress just about every viewpoint and person that doesn't conform to conventional leftist-orthodoxies. This now includes not only blocking potentially controversial speakers (like the notorious IMF head Christine Lagarde) but also demanding that college professors and administrators alert their students before exposing them to anything they might find objectionable or upsetting.

I wrote about this on May 21 in Politico Magazine, but Bloomberg said it better. He said it in the citadel of the liberal intelligentsia. And, of course, he's a heckuva lot more influential! As hizzoner bluntly put it, "A university's obligation is not to teach students what to think but to teach students how to think. And that requires listening to the other side."

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