Additional Topics

  1. As we teased yesterday, third grade reading scores are all over the news across the state today. We start our coverage in Toledo, where the pass rate stands at 76.4% of third graders as of the spring tests. So far, no students have been exempted, officials say, and the district is using the impending summer reading test as a redoubt against “summer slide” for many more third grade students than would perhaps be involved in structured summer learning in previous years.  (Toledo Blade)
     
  2. In Dayton, there’s a lot of summer opportunities for third graders who still need to pass, but the article mainly focuses on what happens if students don't pass even after all that work/additional test opportunities. (Dayton Daily News)
     
  3. The story from Youngstown is fairly introspective. “There’s also awareness on the part of the students,” said YCS’s executive director of teaching and learning. “They’ve really taken this on and made it their own.” But, she says, “…I won’t be happy until all of our kids pass to fourth grade.” Indeed. (Youngstown Vindicator)
     
  4. Finally, the PD has a whole series of articles from various suburban districts that are worth a look. The crux
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PHILADELPHIA SCHOOL FUNDING
With the city council scheduled to begin its summer break tomorrow, Philadelphia schools superintendent William R. Hite Jr. has made a last-minute appeal for an additional $96 million in funding. (Associated Press and NPR)
 
CREATING TEACHER LEADERS
In an op-ed, Leading Educators CEO Jonas Cartock argues that the Vergara ruling has opened a window of opportunity to improve the teaching profession in California—and that districts should commit to crafting leadership paths for teachers. (Hechinger Report)
 
VOUCHER EXPANSION
With the fate of Florida’s voucher-program expansion now in the hands of Governor Rick Scott, opponents are pushing hard for a veto. (Charters & Choice)
 
CONSERVATIVES AND THE COMMON CORE
According to Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll, conservatives are evenly split over the Common Core State Standards, with 45 percent in support and 46 percent in opposition. (Wall Street Journal)
 
CAR TALK
Andy Rotherham and Emmeline Zhao of RealClearEducation somehow convince D.C. schools chancellor Kaya Henderson to get in their car and talk about the pace of change in D.C. schools and the upcoming mayoral election. (RealClearEducation)
 
FORDHAM IN THE NEWS
Northern Public...

  1. Fordham friend and NCTQ trustee Tom Lasley wrote a guest commentary on the effect of excessive teacher absences on students which appeared in the PD over the weekend. He even contributed to the online comments section. Nice. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  2. I assume that this number is a tip of the hat to the dear departed Casey Kasem: Top 40 Straight-A Fund project proposals advanced to the final stage of review. Keep your feet on the ground and keep reaching for the stars. (Gongwer Ohio)
     
  3. Governor Kasich signed the K-12 Education MBR bill into law yesterday. There was no drop-kicking of the dropout-recovery school funding as many had wished. (Gongwer Ohio)
     
  4. Some folks have been lamenting the sausage-like creation of the MBR bills, but not Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson. Two of three provisions he championed in the MBR – correcting language from the main budget bill a year ago – were included in the final bill. These restored much of the oversight over charter schools in Cleveland that he and his Transformation Alliance had won with passage of the Cleveland Plan back in 2012. The third? Well, we’ll see. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
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What do the education-policy world and the sports world have in common? For one, Americans are rabidly passionate about both. What’s more, both really love rankings. And you think we’re bad at soccer? We’re even worse in education.

As everyone reading this probably knows, the U.S. has chronically lagged behind our competitors on international tests. It doesn’t matter which subgroup one looks at—high SES, low SES, top scorers, average scorers—the U.S. hasn’t lived up to its potential. Of course, it doesn’t have to be that way. And all of us in the ed-policy world do what we do because we believe our education system can improve. We know we can do better by our eager students.

Well, the World Cup—the crowning jewel of the “Beautiful Game” and the biggest sporting event in the world—is upon us. And it struck us here at Fordham that the similarities are uncanny. Here, too, the rankings don’t love us. Sports Illustrated and the Soccer Power Index say we’re the nineteenth-best team in the tournament. Heck, even our coach Jürgen Klinsmann doesn’t like our chances. Indeed, look at our soccer and...

The Thomas B. Fordham Institute is thrilled to welcome Robert Pondiscio as our senior fellow and vice president for external affairs, effective today. Here's his first of many posts he will pen as a member of the Fordham Institute team. Look for his posts on topics besides Common Core on Flypaper.

Frank Bruni of the New York Times worries that the pressure of selective college admissions is forcing kids to do “stagy, desperate, disturbing things to stand out.” He tells the story of a would-be Yalie with good grades and test scores but whose personal essay described a conversation with a teacher she admired—a conversation too important and stimulating to interrupt. “During their talk, when an urge to go to the bathroom could no longer be denied, she decided not to interrupt the teacher or exit the room. She simply urinated on herself,” he writes. 

In Bruni’s telling, today’s college applicants have grown up in the era of oversharing, “a tendency toward runaway candor and uncensored revelation, especially about tribulations endured and hardships overcome.”

Certainly this trend of uncensored oversharing is disconcerting. But the fault, dear Bruni, is not in...

  1. Awesome – but brief – interview with Fordham Board member David Ponitz. Focused on higher-ed issues, but interesting nonetheless.  (Dayton Daily News)
  2. Tiny little Lodi News excerpts Fordham’s Mike Petrilli among many brief quotes in its editorial on the Vergara decision. (Lodi News-Sentinel)
  3. Definitely some ruffled feathers in Toledo regarding the split of their Head Start grant. Oddly enough for a Blade story, that doesn’t seem to include the fact that the group splitting the funds with Toledo Public Schools is a for-profit company…from Pennsylvania. It still remains to be seen what the split means for TPS’ plans to take over the YMCA building in Downtown Toledo. (Toledo Blade)
  4. Speaking of for-profit companies in education in Ohio, three smaller districts in Northeast Ohio are banding together to create an alternative program to serve students in their districts at risk of dropping out, reaching as far down as middle school to help children not making it in the traditional school setting. Admirable, yes? But this program will be run by a
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COMMON CORE
A nine-year-old struggling with New York City’s new math curriculum highlights challenges in Common Core implementation. (New York Times)
 
THIRD-GRADE READING
South Carolina governor Nikki Haley signed legislation enacting a third-grade reading guarantee. (Curriculum Matters)
 
CHARTER SPACE
Success Academy’s planned expansion has put Mayor Bill de Blasio in a tough spot: share public-school space with charters or face escalating space costs. (New York Times)
 
HIGH STANDARDS
On Friday, a coalition of business and civic groups in Louisiana called on Governor Bobby Jindal to keep the Common Core. (Associated Press)
 
TENURE
A recent paper finds that under New York City’s tenure changes, ineffective teachers are more likely to leave schools voluntarily. (Teacher Beat)
 
TECHNOLOGY
The Common Core–spurred move to online testing is driving California’s school districts to close the tech gap. (Hechinger Report)
 
INDIAN EDUCATION
President Obama has announced new efforts to improve the schooling of American Indian students. (Politics K–12)
 
FORDHAM IN THE NEWS
Associated Press: “Common Core Upsets Home-Schooling Parents
Forbes: “Why The Vergara Decision Will Not Fundamentally Help Poor And...

  1. Fordham’s Chad Aldis peers into the future of accountability in a world of expanding parental choice. (RedefineED)
     
  2. Speaking of parental choice, a very strange news conference took place at the Lucas County Democratic Party HQ yesterday, announcing nothing newsworthy except to reiterate the views of the Toledo teachers union and local Democrats (two different groups, mind you) that charter schools are a destructive evil that’s causing Toledoans (Toledoites? Toledopolitans?) to suffer. But not good charter schools. They're OK. Oh, and not non-profit good ones either. Mostly just the for-profit ones…that are bad. Luckily one Republican flack and OCQE’s Ron Adler were on hand to lend some balance. Still, nothing newsworthy in this story. At all. (Toledo Blade)
     
  3. The Enquirer parses out passing rates for sophomores in Ohio's public school on this year’s final ever administration of the Ohio Graduation Test. Statewide, around 70 percent passed all five sections. In the Cincy area, it was 73.6 percent. Conveniently, there’s a bottom-five list that includes Winton Woods at 53 percent, New Miami at 50.8 percent, and Mount Healthy at 39 percent. (Cincinnati Enquirer)
     
  4. Of course, the Enquirer piece notes that the graduation testing landscape is a-changing
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The World Cup vs. Underwear Models

Amber and Michelle talk teacher tenure, selective high schools, and the stunning upset of Eric Cantor. Dara takes over the Research Minute with a study on whether vouchers "cherry pick" the best students.

Amber's Research Minute

Contexts Matter: Selection in Means-Tested School Voucher Programs,” by Cassandra M. D. Hart, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis 26(2), June 2014: 186–206.

  1. We start in Cincinnati today with a guest commentary extolling the virtues of some very fine charter schools around Ohio...but mostly in Columbus. Weird. (Cincinnati Enquirer)
     
  2. The revolving door at the state Board of Education may be slowing down. Governor Kasich has already appointed a replacement for the member who resigned earlier this week. Interesting note here about this being the “rural seat”. That leaves only one more to fill, although that one’s been open longer. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  3. The largest of Ohio’s teachers unions is urging Kasich to "drop kick" a provision in the MBR that would provide more money to dropout-recovery charter schools. The story goes to some pains to explain that not all dropout-recovery charters are run by White Hat Management (perennial union whipping boy) and that not all are in the graduation-rate basement, but to quote the OFT president: “Why would we give funds to something that has already proven to be worse than effective?" Why indeed? (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  4. Speaking of teachers in Cleveland, the CMSD board met late into the night on Tuesday and one of its big agenda items was hearing final appeals for teachers identified for
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