Additional Topics

  1. So, yesterday we took a look at open enrollment in one part of Ohio from the perspective of the districts and seemed to conclude that it was “just business” – net “winner” districts are happy, net “losers” are not and it’s all about dollars. Well, today we catch up with another open enrollment story – one that focuses squarely on why students and parents participate in open enrollment and where the call of “it’s just business” did not fly. To refresh your memory: a “net winner” district in Northeast Ohio started feeling guilty about taking so much money from its neighbors and decided to trim the number of open enrollment seats it would fill in 2014-15 (I’m sure the green eye shades were out to work over those numbers), but as that number was well below the number of kids currently in the district from elsewhere, it seemed inevitable that they would have to kick some kids out. Despite assurances to the contrary, the district did just that, non-renewing nearly three dozen students who had been open enrolled and attending in the district for years. An extremely predictable stink arose and last week the school board was forced to retreat, reinstating all the kicked-out students who wanted to return, although honestly those parents and kids have got to wonder if they are really welcome there or if they are “just business”. (Willoughby News Herald)
  2. There’s not much play on this story outside of Columbus yet, but
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You’ve already read in the Ohio Education Gadfly what we think about the third-grade reading scores across Ohio. Around the state, journalists are trying to parse what’s worked and what hasn’t and what districts will do with the approximately 12 percent of third graders who are still at risk of being held back. Here’s a sampling of what the papers are saying:

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  1. Round 2 of Ohio’s Straight A Innovation Fund grants were awarded on Friday. You can check out a description of the final determination process here. (Gongwer Ohio) There were 37 projects awarded funding statewide and we'll be covering a number of them through the week I'm sure. First out of the gate is a list of Franklin County-specific winners, courtesy of the Big D. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  2. I think the headline pretty much says it all, but the story is entertaining nonetheless: “Anti-Charter Groups Crash Community School Info Session, Rail Against ECOT.” Yikes. It’s all-out war this summer in Ohio, methinks. (Gongwer Ohio)
     
  3. In the above story, charter school opponents give lip-service to school quality being of issue to them, but it really is just about money – money following children from district schools to charters. Here is a more detailed version of that same issue around the topic of open enrollment in the Hancock County area. Bottom line: net financial “winner” districts are fine with the system; net financial “loser” districts are not. And it has very little to do with why the students are moving. In fact, most district officials don’t even seem to care why large numbers of their residents are opting to go somewhere else when given the chance – even when that “chance” requires waiting in very long lines. As the headline implies, it’s just business. Fascinating in-depth look. (Findlay Courier)
     
  4. Governor Kasich says that former NY schools chancellor Joel
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VOUCHER EXPANSION
Governor Rick Scott signed a bill expanding Florida’s tax-credit scholarship program. (Pensacola News Journal)
 
TEACHER QUALITY
Some teachers are looking for ways to improve the quality of those within their profession, because “if a union makes collective demands, it also has to promote collective quality.” (Washington Post)
 
PUTTING ADULTS’ INTERESTS OVER KIDS’
The New America Foundation’s Anne Hyslop argues that dropping the Common Core in Louisiana without a policy alternative is reckless and could “quickly wreck years of careful planning and hard work to improve student outcomes across the Pelican State. And that would be a very high price to pay just to make a political statement.” (Real Clear Education)
 
PHILLY SCHOOLS
The Philadelphia City Council will borrow $30 million to help plug the public school district’s funding gap, while it seeks more funding from state lawmakers. (Associated Press)
 
VALUE-ADDED PAUSE
D.C. has paused its use of the value-added algorithm in teacher evaluations for the 2014–15 year, in order to smooth the district’s transition to Common Core–aligned tests. (Teacher Beat)
 
SPECIAL ED IN CHARTER SCHOOLS
A new CRPE study finds that “counseling out” does not explain why Denver’s charter schools have fewer special-education students than their traditional public school counterparts. (Charters & Choice)
 
ENGLISH-LANGUAGE LEARNERS
Florida has adopted a new set of English-language proficiency standards. (Learning the Language)
 
FORDHAM IN THE NEWS
U.S. News: “Climate...

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Note: This post is part of our series, "Netflix Academy: The best educational videos available for streaming." Be sure to check out our previous Netflix Academy posts on dinosaursaquatic lifeinsectsfrogs and other amphibiansreptilesbirdsmammalshuman evolutionearthquakes and volcanoes; outer spaceAncient Asian Culturesearly American civilizationsAncient GreeceAncient RomeNative American culturesChristopher Columbus and the Age of DiscoveryColonial America and the Revolutionary War; the American founders; the Lewis and Clark expeditionmovie adaptations of classic children’s books, and American folk heroes.

Throughout this series, I’ve complained about the relative paucity of streaming videos on human history; now it’s clear that there aren’t nearly enough videos on human biology, either. But we found a few, and they are fantastic, particularly the episodes from The Magic School Bus (which is making a comeback!). Enjoy—and, as always, let us know if you find some others, too.

Special thanks to research interns Ashley Council and Liz McInerney for helping to compile these lists.

Best videos on the systems of the human body

 

1. The Magic School Bus Inside Ralphie (Season 1, Episode 3)

Why does Ralphie have a fever? Time for a field trip inside Ralphie's body to find out. But white blood cells start to attack the

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  1. Fordham's Chad Aldis appeared on a much more sedate radio segment earlier this week, returning to WHK to talk more about the Common Core. The audio finally is available. Check it out. (WHK-AM, Cleveland)
     
  2. It must be a Friday during summer break because the education news in thin on the ground today. NCTQ’s new report analyzing teacher prep programs in Ohio spoke well of the University of Dayton and Miami University, and the DDN wants you to know. (Dayton Daily News)
     
  3. Remember that governor’s race we mentioned yesterday? Education came up again; this time dueling statements on the Third Grade Reading Guarantee. Says incumbent Kasich: “The whole point is not that some fail and some pass… It's that everybody gets the skills." Says challenger FitzGerald: “This week's test results reinforce that in order to ensure our children are reading at grade level by the third grade we must make a real investment in early childhood education and universal pre-K.” It’s going to be a long summer in Ohio. (Cleveland Plain Dealer)
     
  4. Graduation season is over in most schools and districts in Ohio and we’ve talked about a couple of the more unusual news stories resulting. But this is by far the most interesting: 11 teenagers “graduated” from Children’s Services custody in Butler County this week. All of them graduated from high school as well, against gigantic odds. One young woman says: “I was told I was probably going to drop out of school
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  1. I missed this piece in yesterday’s barrage of clips on third grade reading scores around the state: Fordham’s Chad Aldis gets the last word on the subject of what the passage rate numbers mean in Gongwer’s report. (Gongwer Ohio)
     
  2. Perhaps, though, I was really distracted yesterday morning by this wild ride of a radio townhall on the Common Core, in which Chad took a central role as literally the only person to have any idea of what the Common Core actually was. At one point there were a dozen open mics, Chad was asked for the sixth time (dared, really) to explain what exactly Common Core was, and got nothing but bashing for doing it. Some comments worth listening out for: “If Common Core will make kids ‘career-ready’, why doesn’t it require students to learn how to read a tape measure?”; “I know algebra, but my kids won’t need that stuff. Why put it in there if they don’t need it?”; “They’re reinventing the alphabet.”; and the inevitable reference to Communist Russia. This is long but a completely eye-opening view of what happens when Common Core haters on both left and right – with zero real information – get a wide open mic and a willing victim. The Common Core portion of the program begins at the 68 minute mark. (WSOM-AM, Youngstown)
     
  3. As we have to remind ourselves around here sometimes, there’s a governor’s race going on in Ohio. Sometimes education even comes up. Democratic candidate
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Success Academy, the high-performing charter network run by tough-as-nails Eva Moskowitz, is looking to expand—and has put Mayor Bill de Blasio in a tough spot. He has long opposed the policy of allowing charter schools to share space with traditional public schools, enacted by his predecessor. However, a state law passed in April requires that he do just that—or give the schools money to find their own space. And as the New York Times notes, “The last time he denied space to Success Academy schools, it led to the law that now handcuffs him.”

Governor Bobby Jindal has issued executive orders that, he says, will remove Louisiana from the Common Core and PARCC. “Not so fast,” say State Education Superintendent John White and others who point out that Jindal doesn’t have that power, especially on the standards. “This is all political theater,” said Mike to Politico. “Gov. Jindal will score points with the tea party, but his actions seem likely to be stymied in court.” Or so we hope.

This week, a New York Times piece, featuring both an article and an accompanying short video, highlighted New York’s transition to the Common Core. Kids are struggling to adjust to thinking critically and writing evidence-based rather than personal essays, and teachers are struggling to teach the new standards with new materials—while the low test scores in the first Common Core–aligned tests dinged their confidence. However, as the teacher featured in the Times’s video points...

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In which Michelle admonishes Governor Jindal

Michelle and Brickman discuss pausing accountability while states transition to the Common Core, the perils of playing politics with Eva Moskowitz, and Governor Bobby Jindal’s Common Core bluster. Amber schools us on teacher prep.

Amber's Research Minute

2014 Teacher Prep Review: A Review of the Nation’s Teacher Preparation Programs by Julie Greenberg, Kate Walsh, and Arthur McKee, (Washington, D.C.: National Council on Teacher Quality, June 2014).

  1. As we teased yesterday, third grade reading scores are all over the news across the state today. We start our coverage in Toledo, where the pass rate stands at 76.4% of third graders as of the spring tests. So far, no students have been exempted, officials say, and the district is using the impending summer reading test as a redoubt against “summer slide” for many more third grade students than would perhaps be involved in structured summer learning in previous years.  (Toledo Blade)
     
  2. In Dayton, there’s a lot of summer opportunities for third graders who still need to pass, but the article mainly focuses on what happens if students don't pass even after all that work/additional test opportunities. (Dayton Daily News)
     
  3. The story from Youngstown is fairly introspective. “There’s also awareness on the part of the students,” said YCS’s executive director of teaching and learning. “They’ve really taken this on and made it their own.” But, she says, “…I won’t be happy until all of our kids pass to fourth grade.” Indeed. (Youngstown Vindicator)
     
  4. Finally, the PD has a whole series of articles from various suburban districts that are worth a look. The crux of the story in CMSD: predictability. As Patrick O’Donnell write: “Cleveland's results came back almost exactly as the district had predicted. The district had estimated in March that about 1,000 students would need extra help this summer to pass the test. The new OAA results show that 999 of
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