Additional Topics

  1. I guess every day of news clips can’t focus on Fordham. *Sigh* The folks at StateImpact took a look at Innovation Ohio’s latest report on charter school funding, which was released the same day as our Bellwether report. In fact, that report is mentioned obliquely here, along with the CREDO report on Ohio charter school performance released last week. (And not in a nice way, but what’s new?) The usual “us vs. them” rhetoric is trotted out in this brief story, but it ends on a positive note: charter opponents “want state lawmakers to take up the school funding issue during the next session.” We’re with you. Let’s do it. (StateImpact Ohio)
     
  2. The 130th Ohio General Assembly has pretty much ridden off into the sunset, but not before a final flurry of lame duck legislation as the night was falling yesterday. And it’s fascinating what can find its way into bills in the twilight hours. To wit: a provision added to HB178 allows, for the first time, certain students eligible for the Cleveland Scholarship Program to use their vouchers in a private school just outside the city limits of Cleveland. We applaud this small but significant move and are glad that these few Cleveland families are truly able to choose the school they want for their children, regardless of geographic boundaries. How about we blow that up big and allow it for everyone? (Gongwer Ohio)
     
  3. During the debate around possible elimination Ohio’s so-called “5 of 8”
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  • Will an end to the annual testing mandates be the defining feature of a reauthorized No Child Left Behind Act? Education Week’s Alyson Klein reports a draft bill circulating among Senate GOP aides would leave testing schedules up to the states—no more mandatory reading and math tests in grades 3–8. Someone should remind the GOP that annual testing made clear that every student in every grade matters. Oh, wait. We did that.
  • They won’t have John King to kick around anymore. New York’s education chief is stepping down to become a senior adviser to Arne Duncan. More than “inspirational,” the adjective “embattled” had become a more common frozen epithet attached to King, who presided over the rollout of Common Core and pushed for strong teacher evaluations. In doing so, he ran afoul of the state’s teachers unions and anti-reform activists, who accused him of not listening even while jeering and shouting down the dignified King at series of public forums last year. He will be missed. 
  • ProPublica ran a piece blowing the whistle on “sweeps contracts,” wherein non-profit charter schools funnel nearly all their public dollars into the coffers of for-profit management companies. Potentially alarming, but This Week in Education blogger Alexander Russo rightly noted the ProPublica piece offered no clue on just how widespread the practice is. “A NACSA staffer tells me that there's no national data but that these situations aren't rare,” Russo writes.

This study in the Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis Journal examines the role of the school environment in relation to teacher effectiveness over time. On average, we know that teachers tend to make rapid gains in effectiveness in their early years—and that this growth rate tapers off with additional experience. But this finding is too broad. Thus, analysts explored the differences that exist across individual teachers working in different schools to uncover the role that school culture might play in their varied effectiveness over time. They use administrative records from third to eighth grade for years 2000–2010 in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools, which include more than 280,000 student records and roughly 3,200 teachers. They combine these data with responses from a state teacher survey that gauges working conditions, such as whether the school is safe, orderly, and characterized by mutual trust and respect; whether teachers collaborate on teaching practices; whether the principal supports teachers; and so on. After controlling for numerous student-, peer-, school-, and teacher-level variables, analysts find that the variation in returns to teaching experience is explained in part by differences in schools’ professional environments. Findings show that working in a more supportive environment is related to improvement that actually accumulates throughout the first ten years of a teacher’s career. (The gift that keeps on giving!) Specifically, after ten years, teachers working at a school with a more supportive environment moved up in the distribution of overall teacher effectiveness by roughly one-fifth of a standard deviation more than teachers...

With the fiftieth anniversary at hand for the celebrated and once-controversial "Moynihan Report," the late Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan is back on people's minds and keyboards. There will be more of this attention as 2015 unfolds. But Pat Moynihan is seldom off my mind, as he was primus-inter-pares of the mentors who mattered in my life and career, as well as my primary boss in three different settings between 1969 and 1981 (not to mention my doctoral advisor). My first "grown-up" job at his side—if age twenty-five counts as grown-up—was as a junior White House education aide at the start of the Nixon administration. (My version of this tale is recounted in the early chapters of Troublemaker, if you're a real glutton for punishment.) Pat was an assistant to the president for urban affairs, with an office in the West Wing not far from Kissinger's. The other room in his cramped basement suite was occupied by his chief deputy, Steve Hess (who for most of the time since has been an exceptionally prolific senior fellow at Brookings and one of Washington's true "wise men"—as well as a member of the vanishing species known as "moderate Republicans”). Steve has now written, and Brookings has just published, a thoroughly delightful account of the eventful first year of the Nixon-Moynihan relationship, which was unlikely from the outset, but rapidly proved to be both mutually beneficial and highly productive. ...

The charter school sector in the United States encompasses forty-two states and the District of Columbia, with 6,400 charter schools serving 2.5 million students. More than 1,000 authorizers oversee these schools, working under state laws that seek to balance school autonomy and accountability for results. This report, conducted by the National Association of Charter School Authorizers (NACSA), evaluates the quality of those laws. NACSA has identified eight policies that facilitate the development of effective charters, including performance management and replication, default closures, and authorizer sanctions. States are awarded points—on a thirty- or twenty-seven-point scale, depending on the group—based on the strength each of these policies in their charter schools laws. NACSA divided the states into three groups, according to their charter-authorizing landscapes, and then assigned ranks within. They include: (1) seventeen district-authorizing states, (2) five states with many authorizers, and (3) twenty-one states with few authorizers. South Carolina topped the first list with a score of twenty-five out of thirty. Last place here (and in the nation) is Kansas, with zero, for which the report blamed the state’s “dead” charter law; though legal, the schools do not have autonomous governing boards or alternative authorizers. In the second group, Indiana led with eighteen points out of a possible twenty-seven. And despite being the newest charter state, Washington earned not only the best marks in the final group, but the best in the nation—a perfect thirty out of thirty. Speaking of perfection, NACSA unfortunately does not achieve it; a few of...

It was the best of times…

…for the Republican Party. Election Day 2014 was a rout, with the GOP winning full control of Congress and its largest House majority since World War II. Republican governors were re-elected in Florida, Wisconsin, Michigan, Kansas, and Maine. Democrat Pat Quinn was booted out of office in President Obama’s home state of Illinois. Republican now control two-thirds of state legislatures too. The GOP groundswell “will be good for education reform, especially reforms of the school-choice variety,” predicted Fordham’s Mike Petrilli

It was the worst of times…

...for teachers’ unions. “It’s open season on teacher employment protection laws in U.S. state courts,” noted Fordham’s Brandon Wright on the heels of June’s Vergara v. California verdict holding California’s tenure laws unconstitutional. And the hits just kept on coming. In October, the commission that runs the financially troubled Philadelphia public school system unilaterally canceled the union’s contract and ruled teachers must contribute to their health insurance to free up money for classrooms. (A good decision to avoid the big squeeze.) Election Day made the annus horribilis complete. The $60 million the AFT and NEA spent on campaigns merely advertised their impotence. The unions took out their frustrations in the waning days of 2014 on a TIME magazine cover story on tenure. “It’s a lot easier to gin up phony outrage over magazine covers than reckon with the question of...

JEB THE APOSTATE
Will Jeb Bush’s support of the Common Core keep him from realizing his presidential aspirations? Since his announcement yesterday that he has “decided to actively explore the possibility of running for president of the United States,” Politico, The Hill, and Time have all published articles detailing how the issue might hinder Jeb’s campaign, while Libby Nelson of Vox explained why it won’t affect his run.  

BE PREPARED (DISNEY ALERT)
The 2012 suspension of six teaching programs at Lake Superior State University in Michigan has been called a much-needed wake up call, and many argue that other schools should follow suit. But Education Week reports that many schools are hesitant to pull the plug on their teacher prep programs, even when they are not adequately training future teachers for the classroom. Teacher programs, and their lack of accountability, have been called out before; for more, read NCTQ’s 2014 Teacher Prep Review.

WON'T SOMEBODY PLEASE THINK OF THE HARVARD GRADS
Alternative teacher prep program Teach For America reports a drop in corps applications this year, potentially losing 25 percent of recruitment potential. Training Institutes in New York and Los Angeles may be the first to feel the effects of a drop in enrollment, but TFA spokespeople say some pockets across the country are swelling with candidate applications. 

IN MY DAY WE WERE UP CHOPPING FIREWOOD BY DAWN
Following recommendations in a report by the...

Dear Santa,

On behalf of a host of certified experts, policy wonks, busybodies and know-it-alls: All I would like for Christmas this year is your help in getting people to do what we know is best for them rather than what they want to do.

I know, I know, there are all those old clichés about a free society and the “pursuit of happiness.” But why do those stubborn kids and parents refuse to understand that we know better than they do what will bring them happiness? OK, maybe not perfect happiness, but we certainly know what’s good for them.

Consider Michelle Obama. She went to Princeton, for Pete’s sake, and Harvard Law School. I think she even passed the bar exam. She’s a real expert on so many things. She definitely knows what’s good for kids. After all, she has two of her own. And she has some sort of garden at the White House where they grow stuff that she says is healthy to eat. Surely she knows better than kids and parents and cafeteria ladies and Aramark what students ought to eat for lunch. After all, she persuaded the president of the United States and the Congress—experts all—to change the rules regarding the food that schools serve to their pupils.

But those stubborn kids don’t want to eat what she says they should eat—and they’re bankrupting their school districts by refusing to buy it! They’re not just stubborn. They’re downright destructive! If only...

1. It’s been a whirlwind couple of weeks here at Fordham Ohio’s policy HQ. Yesterday, we held a public event to herald the release of the new report from Bellwether Education Partners, outlining 10 policy recommendations to improve the quality of Ohio’s charter school sector, something that is sorely needed. Here is a selection of coverage as it stands now. More will likely follow in the coming days:

2. Fordham, and the Bellwether report (and maybe a certain humble news clipper perhaps?), got the Big D’s Education Insider thinking about the legally-embattled...

  1. Bellwether Education Partners today released a new report detailing ten policy recommendations to help improve the quality of Ohio’s charter school sector. Fordham’s Chad Aldis is quoted in this piece from the Big D. As partners in the report, we are hopeful for much more attention to the report in coming days and weeks. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  2. Fordham’s Aaron Churchill was busy on the airwaves yesterday, talking about Common Core on two radio shows. The second hasn’t been archived yet, but yesterday’s first appearance was on the Ron Ponder Show on WHBC in Canton, where Aaron appeared in between segments on standards and testing with the superintendent of Canton City Schools. You can hear the WHBC audio by clicking here. (WHBC-AM, Canton)
     
  3. Going back to the subject of charter schools for a second, here’s a story about a dream that refuses to die…even though it probably should. A Pittsburgh-area man is trying for the fifth time to launch a charter school in his Pennsylvania hometown. Why do we in Ohio care about this story? Don’t we have charter problems of our own going back many years? Yes, we do. And he was one of them, as founder of the two Talented Tenth charter schools in Columbus shut down last year by the Ohio Department of Education as “educational travesties”. Here’s hoping he gets skunked again in PA. (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette)
     
  4. The PD published an opinion piece this morning on teacher compensation. Seems like the author
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