Ohio Policy

When Governor John Kasich released his proposed budget bill (House Bill 64), it generated immediate buzz in the Ohio education...
Greg Harris
Greg Harris is Ohio state director for StudentsFirst. Despite fierce efforts to derail the Ohio Teacher Evaluation System midway...
With all the attention that’s focused on teachers, principals must feel like the neglected stepchild of education reform...
Right on schedule, district officials, driven by self-interest, are airing their grievances over Governor Kasich’s school-funding...
Community stakeholders in Cincinnati – including philanthropy, education, and more – have formed a coalition whose goal is to...
Thank you Chairman Hayes, Vice Chair Brenner, Ranking Member Fedor, and members of the House Education Committee, for allowing me...
Ohio Gadfly readers won’t be surprised to know that we were thrilled to see Governor John Kasich strongly endorse charter school...
Like Moses in the wilderness, state policymakers have to cope with incessant grumbling—in their case over standardized testing...
The 2015 legislative session is gearing up, and Common Core will again feature prominently in the education agenda. Longtime Core...
Financing public education has historically been the joint responsibility of state and local governments. But while traditional...
Over the course of 2014, a series of reports from the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) spotlighted some serious issues...
Before Christmas, we gave you the rundown of all the media outlets that focused on charter quality and policy thanks to two...
Over 120,000 charter students in Ohio deserve the opportunity to receive an excellent education. But far too often, Ohio charters...
It’s been a busy month in the world of Ohio charter schools. First, on December 9, Stanford University’s Center for Research on...
This fall, the editorial boards of two of Ohio’s most widely read newspapers issued stinging missives urging legislators to make...
Charter schools are quickly becoming a defining feature of Ohio’s public-education landscape, educating over 120,000 children...
The 2014 Fordham Sponsorship Annual Report is our opportunity to share the Fordham Foundation’s work as the sponsor of eleven...
Yesterday at The City Club of Cleveland, Dr. Margaret (Macke) Raymond of the Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO)...
Charter schools are quickly becoming a defining feature of Ohio’s public-education landscape, educating over 120,000 children...
Editor’s Note: On Thursday, November 13, Chad Aldis testified before the Ohio House Education Committee on the substitute bill...
Can a state’s charter school sector improve over time? Yes, finds this new study of Texas charter schools. Using student data...
Earlier this year, the California Charter Schools Association (CCSA) published its annual report on charter quality . Their...
In January, the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Office of Civil Rights in the Department of...
The information yielded by standardized tests—and the analyses based on test results, like value-added—should form the basis for...
In spring 2013, Ohio policymakers approved a two-year, $250 million investment aimed at spurring innovation in public schools...
Chances are, you’ve heard something in the past year about test mania. Everyone from superintendents to parents to retired...

This article is part of a new Education Next series on the state of the American family that marks the fiftieth anniversary of the 1965 release of the Moynihan Report.

This may seem like a ridiculous question: How can schools possibly persuade more adults to marry—and not have children out of wedlock? Fifty years ago, Daniel Patrick Moynihan himself decided it was inadvisable to offer solutions to problems afflicting minority families. Since then, our familial challenges have only grown deeper and wider, with four in ten American babies now born to unwed mothers. That includes a majority of all...

I’ve always liked Fridays as much as the next guy, but this year I especially like them. The reason is that every Friday, my students and I read an obituary together. If that sounds morbid, let me tell you what I tell the kids: An obituary is the story of a life; death is just the detail that gets it printed.

How do I select the weekly life story we read? I don’t. I have other people do it for me. I’ve been asking folks around town—elected officials, businesspeople, civic leaders, colleagues, and friends—this question: If you could pick one...

  • Though House of Cards returned magnificently to form last weekend, ESEA doesn’t look like it’s headed for a similar renewal any time soon: Friday’s expected House vote on the Student Success Act went up in a puff of smoke and a fit of Mephistophelean laughter from the spirit of Frank Underwood. The Republican bill suffered somewhat from the mad rush to keep the lights on at the Department of Homeland Security, which took most of the air out of the chamber. Ideology played a role, too—after the Heritage Foundation and Club for Growth came out strongly against proposal, conservative
  • ...

This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of the Moynihan Report. The great tootling racket now bursting your eardrums is the trumpet blast of memorials, think-pieces, and reflections commemorating the occasion.

The report, which kicked up a generations-long debate on race and culture far afield from its technocratic origins, primarily concerned itself with the vanishing of two-parent families in the black community. That phenomenon is also the subject of this counterintuitive Education Next study. Its authors, however, have no need to limit their focus on a particular racial category, since single parenthood is now commonplace...

There is no shortage of theories to explain how learning works and how teachers, as purveyors of knowledge, should disseminate that knowledge to students (though there tends to be a shortage of supporting evidence for any of them). In The Teaching Brain, doctoral candidate and former New York City schoolteacher Vanessa Rodriguez proposes yet another: Forget learning styles and multiple intelligences; teaching is all about “awarenesses”—of learners as individuals, of teaching practices, contexts, and interactions, and of one’s “self as a teacher.” 

She casts off older theories as antiquated, instinctive, and too student-centered, arguing that they’ve hindered educational innovation and...

Florida—home to Disney World, sunny skies, and bizarre crimes—is probably best known for its sizable elderly population. Yet a new report from the state’s Foundation for Excellence in Education warns that we are all Florida, or will be soon enough. Dr. Matthew Ladner, who pens the report, predicts that by 2030, the demographics in most of the country will mirror those in today’s geriatric Sunshine State. And that doesn’t bode well for our nation’s fiscal health.

Seventy-six million Baby Boomers will soon leave the workforce. Growing along with this cohort—albeit at a lesser rate—is the school-aged population. As a...

ESEA reauthorization, the op-out movement, Indiana vouchers, and college access. Featuring a guest appearance by the Cato Institute’s Neal McCluskey.

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