Ohio Policy

A new analysis from Matthew A. Kraft at Brown University links the characteristics of laid-off teachers to changes in student...
Like other states, Ohio has over the past few years put into place a standards and accountability framework with the clear goal...
NOTE: This is the Foreword from Fordham’s latest report , released today. Over the past few years, states across the nation have...
The Education Trust recently responded to two analyses in which I looked at the relationship between overall and disadvantaged...
When Governor Kasich signed the budget on June 30, two significant changes to Ohio’s assessment system became law. First, safe...
It’s that time of year: Parents are perusing the back-to-school section with their perhaps not-so-eager-to-return-to-school...
In early May, a coalition of stakeholders from business, philanthropy, and education organizations in Cincinnati announced a bold...
Recently, ACT disaggregated its 2014 test results and college retention rates in order to get a closer look at the college...
Even though measures to improve charter school quality are currently stalled in the Ohio General Assembly , Fordham remains...
As ESEA reauthorization heads to conference committee, debate is certain to center on whether federal law should require states...
On June 30, Governor John Kasich vetoed forty-four items in the budget and signed the rest into law. Among the provisions that...
Trailing only Medicaid, school spending is the second-largest public expenditure in Ohio’s $65 billion annual budget . Over the...
A thorough overview of Ohio's teacher evaluation framework
The Ohio Education Research Center (OERC) recently r eported the teacher evaluation results from 2013–14, the first year of...
In the reauthorization debate, civil rights groups are pressing to have ESEA force states to "do something" in schools where...
For the past year, Ohio policymakers have been grappling with the issue of deregulating public schools. But what does...
Although charter schools were created to be laboratories of innovation, regulations and policies often prevent them from reaching...
Are states dutifully reporting the fraction of students who are on track for college or career? According to a new report from...
Intra-district choice has long been a type of school choice supported by many people who don’t really like school choice. Since...
By Deven Carlson and Stéphane Lavertu School Closures and Student Achievement: An Analysis of Ohio’s Urban District and Charter...

The tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina provided a much-needed occasion to reflect on the progress of the city’s schools since the floodwaters receded. One of the most important questions is whether New Orleans can stand as a national model for those seeking to transform the education—and therefore the life outcomes—of low-income children of color. I’m not completely sold yet.

In the wake of the storm, New Orleans’s education system was rebuilt virtually from scratch. More than one hundred low-performing schools were placed under the jurisdiction of Louisiana’s Recovery School District (RSD), which was...

Standardized tests are commonly blamed for narrowing the school curriculum to reading and math. That’s one reason Congress is considering changes in the law that could lead states to put less emphasis on test scores. But even if we abolished standardized tests tomorrow, a majority of elementary schools would continue to pay scant attention to subjects like history and science.

Consider this: In 1977, twenty-five years before No Child Left Behind ushered in the era of high-stakes testing, elementary school teachers spent only about fifty minutes each day on science...

A school district should never go broke. But unfortunately, they can, and do. Take Pennsylvania’s beleaguered Chester Upland School District. Teachers will once again work for free as the district faces a $22 million deficit, which the Washington Post reports could grow to $46 million. The district of approximately three thousand students was first tagged as “financially distressed” in 1994, and since then, its enrollment has declined by nearly 60 percent even as special education costs have risen substantially. Neither of these developments came as a surprise. Yet the district still overspent...

  • The myth of America’s teacher shortage, like your older brother’s stories about alligators in the sewers and malevolent hitchhikers stalking the roadways, poses an intriguing question: If we’re going to invent fanciful stories for our own amusement, why do they have to be scary ones? In an in-depth piece for Chalkbeat Indiana, Shaina Cavazos debunks ominous reports of a teacher deficit in the Hoosier State with a lot of the same data and arguments that contradict the broader notion of a national shortage. While some districts are facing a lack of qualified applicants, our education schools are still
  • ...

Most of the sturm und drang over Common Core has centered on the politics of the standards’ creation and adoption. The bigger problem—much bigger—was always going to be implementation. This new brief from the Education Trust offers a glimpse of how it’s going. Alas, the answer is not very well.

An analysis of middle school classroom assignments finds that most “do not reflect the high-level goals” set by Common Core. This, the report suggests, demonstrates where teachers are in their understanding of the higher standards. Among the sobering data points: A mere 6 percent of the assignment fell into the...

A new working paper by American University public policy professor Seth Gershenson examines whether a “match” of students and teachers by race has any effect on teacher expectations of students. What is the result, for example, of white instructors teaching black students versus white students? What about other racial combinations?

Gershenson used nationally representative survey data from the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS) for U.S. students who were in tenth grade in 2002. There were over sixteen thousand student-teacher matches, which included various demographic data about the students and teachers. And each student’s tenth-grade math and English teachers reported...

A new analysis from Matthew A. Kraft at Brown University links the characteristics of laid-off teachers to changes in student achievement. The analysis was conducted in Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools (CMS), which laid off just over a thousand teachers as a result of the Great Recession in 2009 and 2010. Since North Carolina is one of five states where collective bargaining is illegal, a discretionary layoff policy was used rather than the more common “last-hired, first-fired” (sometimes referred to as LIFO—last in, first out) method. CMS identified candidates for layoffs based on five general criteria: duplicative positions, enrollment trends, job performance,...

Education in New Orleans, school governance, Common Core-aligned assignments, and charter school openings in NYC.

Amber's Research Minute

SOURCE: Andrew Saultz, Dan Fitzpatrick, and Rebecca Jacobsen, "Exploring the Supply Side: Factors Related to Charter School Openings in NYC", Journal of School Choice: International Research and Reform, vol. 9 no. 3 (August 2015). 

As Common Core gathers speed in forty-three states and DC, what does it mean for high-ability students and gifted-and-talented education?  Some contend that higher standards for all mean gifted education is no longer necessary for some. Others insist that increasing the rigor of classes will automatically serve high achievers well. Some claim that differentiated instruction does the trick, while others worry that the country’s ablest students will lose what little claim they presently have on curriculum and instruction suited to their needs.

Who’s right?

Watch this discussion on what the Common Core portends for gifted students and their teachers, moderated by Fordham’s own Chester E. Finn, Jr.

Report Release: Common Core and Gifted Education: Myths, Opportunities, and Strategies for Success By Jonathan Plucker

PANELISTS

Tricia Ebner
Gifted Intervention Specialist and ELA teacher, Lake Middle School
NBCT, PARCC ELC
 @TebnerEbner
Jonathan Plucker
Raymond Neag Endowed Professor of Education, University of Connecticut 
 @JonathanPlucker
Rena Subotnik
Director, Center for Psychology in Schools and Education, American Psychological Association

MODERATOR

Chester E. Finn, Jr.
Distinguished Senior Fellow and President Emeritus, Fordham Institute

 

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