Ohio Policy

Editor’s Note: On Thursday, November 13, Chad Aldis testified before the Ohio House Education Committee on the substitute bill...
Can a state’s charter school sector improve over time? Yes, finds this new study of Texas charter schools. Using student data...
A firestorm has erupted in Ohio on a proposed state board of education administrative rule. The headline on Diane Ravitch’s blog...
Earlier this year, the California Charter Schools Association (CCSA) published its annual report on charter quality . Their...
Over the last five years, prodded by the feds, states have adopted teacher evaluation systems. According to a recent report from...
In January, the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Office of Civil Rights in the Department of...
The information yielded by standardized tests—and the analyses based on test results, like value-added—should form the basis for...
In his recent State of the Schools speech , Cleveland Metropolitan School District (CMSD) CEO Eric Gordon referred to a 2013...
Ohio is moving to new standardized tests , the PARCC assessments, which are set to commence in spring 2015. These new and vastly...
Last week, the Ohio Education Research Center (OERC) hosted a terrific conference at Ohio State University which brought together...
John A. Dues
John A. Dues is the Chief Learning Officer for United Schools Network in Columbus. "There can be no keener revelation of a...
A 2014 report from the Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE) shows that the number of first-year teachers in the...
With any luck, the “ Know Your Charter ” website from Innovation Ohio (IO) and the Ohio Education Association (OEA) will go the...
On September 12th, Ohio released school report-card ratings for the 2013-14 school year. This report compiles and analyzes the...

Last week, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute teamed up with the London-based Education Foundation to host a conference, “School Leadership: Lessons from England”; to publish a new paper by University of Pennsylvania professor Jonathan Supovitz and the Center for Policy Research in Education, Building a Lattice for School Leadership: The Top-to-Bottom Rethinking of Leadership Development in England and What It Might Mean for American Education; and to release a short documentary, Leadership Evolving: New...

Halfway through my senior year of college, I quit. Why? Because I didn’t want to graduate. I had no idea what I was going to do next.

I was one of those students who did everything she was supposed to do. Good grades, good college, all that. But school was all I had ever known, and not once during my sixteen years of education do I recall anyone ever making an explicit connection between what I was learning in school and what I might actually do for a living...

  • Conventional wisdom suggests would-be GOP presidential candidates are supposed to disavow the Common Core (cf. Bobby Jindal), but Jeb Bush and Governor John Kasich didn’t get the memo. During a speech last Thursday in Washington, the former Florida governor emphasized the importance of raising academic standards in America’s schools, which starts with the Common Core. And if states opt to forgo adoption, any replacement ought to be even more rigorous, Bush said. Likewise, Governor Kasich, speaking last week at the Republican Governors Association, continued his strong and unwavering support of the CCSS, reiterating that governors wrote
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This study, conducted by economists at the University of Toronto, examines the impact of a comprehensive Canadian academic and social support program for at-risk youth called Pathways to Education. The voluntary program starts with a contract, signed by the youngsters and their and parents, that requires each student to participate in twice-monthly meetings with a “support worker” who helps the children deal with any academic or social issues that arise during their high school careers. Participants must also attend free weekly tutoring and group activities such as sporting events, cooking classes, and community recycling projects. They receive career counseling, college...

The Cristo Rey Network comprises twenty-eight private schools serving 9,000 students nationwide. Ninety-six percent of network students are minority (largely Hispanic), and 100 percent are economically disadvantaged (defined as households earning less than 75 percent of the national median income). The schools utilize an innovative education model that honors its Catholic roots while simultaneously embracing new ways of preparing economically disadvantaged high school students for future success. This report from the Lexington Institute profiles the Cristo Rey model and looks at how—despite great success—the laudable network is still searching for ways to improve. A defining feature of the schools is...

Myriad obstacles stand between low-income students and a college education—even for those who beat the odds, graduate from high school, and gain acceptance into a post-secondary institution. Indeed, 20 percent of these young people will not make it past their first semester—which raises a couple of questions: Why is this happening? And how do we fix it? According to authors Benjamin Castleman and Lindsay Page, much of the problem is what happens (or doesn’t) between the last day of high school and the first days of college. They call it the “summer melt.” Things like stacks of enrollment paperwork, complicated...

Conor Williams guest stars.

The Ferguson grand jury decision, pre-K for disadvantaged kids, school discipline, and summer reading programs.

Amber's Research Minute

What does school leadership development in England look like, how is it changing, and what can other countries learn from the English approach?

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