Ohio Policy

As ESEA reauthorization heads to conference committee, debate is certain to center on whether federal law should require states...
On June 30, Governor John Kasich vetoed forty-four items in the budget and signed the rest into law. Among the provisions that...
Charter schools joined the usual suspects—tax reform, school funding, and Medicaid—as one of the most debated and well-publicized...
Trailing only Medicaid, school spending is the second-largest public expenditure in Ohio’s $65 billion annual budget . Over the...
Nominally, private schools (or “chartered nonpublic schools,” as they are known in the Ohio Revised Code) operate with a minimal...
A thorough overview of Ohio's teacher evaluation framework
Over the last twenty years, Ohio has transformed its vocational schools of yesteryear—saddled with limited programs, narrowly...
The Ohio Education Research Center (OERC) recently r eported the teacher evaluation results from 2013–14, the first year of...
Passed by the Ohio House and Senate, House Bill 70 sharpens the powers and duties of “ academic distress commissions ” (ADCs) in...
In the reauthorization debate, civil rights groups are pressing to have ESEA force states to "do something" in schools where...
Many people have misconceptions about career and technical education (CTE) that are grounded in an archaic view labeling CTE as...
Last week, Ohio policymakers took a bold step toward strengthening education in persistently low-performing districts. House Bill...
A push by some charter advocates resulted in a last-minute amendment to House Bill 2 which may introduce the “California Similar...
For the past year, Ohio policymakers have been grappling with the issue of deregulating public schools. But what does...
The Ohio Senate recently passed Senate Bill 3 (SB 3), legislation focused on “deregulation,” and sent it on to the House. The...
Although charter schools were created to be laboratories of innovation, regulations and policies often prevent them from reaching...
Teaching is hard. (Even if I weren’t a former high school teacher I would know that.) And it’s particularly hard when you feel...
The Ohio Department of Education (ODE) this week gave notice to four charter schools that it sponsors of its determination to...
On May 18, another bill aimed at repealing Common Core in Ohio was introduced. House Bill 212 is far more troublesome than its...
When it comes to the raucous debate over standardized testing, cooler heads might just prevail. In a recent move, PARCC announced...
Are states dutifully reporting the fraction of students who are on track for college or career? According to a new report from...
Much attention has been paid to why teachers quit . Statistics and studies get thrown around , and there are countless theories...
Intra-district choice has long been a type of school choice supported by many people who don’t really like school choice. Since...
By Deven Carlson and Stéphane Lavertu School Closures and Student Achievement: An Analysis of Ohio’s Urban District and Charter...
Marianne Lombardo
EDITOR’S NOTE: The original version of this commentary was published on EdReform Now’s blog on April 8. The post contrasted...
Over 120,000 charter students in Ohio deserve the opportunity to receive an excellent education. But far too often, Ohio charters...

Editor's note: This post is the second in a series reflecting on the author's first year as superintendent at the Partnership Schools, a nonprofit school management organization that (thanks to an historic agreement with the Archdiocese of New York) was granted broad authority to manage and operate six pre-K–8 urban Catholic schools.

Last week, Eliza Shapiro published an article at Capitol New York that explored the “charter-like” approach the Partnership for Inner-City Education is bringing to its Catholic schools. In many ways, that characterization is true. We are, after all, partnering with some pioneers from the charter world. And...

As ESEA reauthorization heads to conference committee, debate is certain to center on whether federal law should require states to intervene if certain subgroups are falling behind in otherwise satisfactory schools. Civil rights groups tend to favor mandatory intervention. Conservatives (and the teachers’ unions) want states to decide how to craft their school ratings systems, and when and how to take action if schools don’t measure up. The Obama administration is siding with the civil rights groups; a recent White House release, clearly timed to influence the ESEA debate, notes that we “know that disadvantaged students often fall behind in higher-performing...

  • “Irony is often amusing,” writes Calhoun School Headmaster Steve Nelson in his new philippic against rigor in early childhood education, proving once again that he lacks even a basic understanding of what that word means. It’s not totally clear what gets taught at Nelson’s $45,000-per-year academy, but the Gadfly’s definition of irony is this: when the half-million-dollar mouthpiece of one of the ritziest schools on the Upper West Side descends from Olympus to admonish teachers of impoverished students against actually trying to teach them anything. “Play-based,” content-free learning might be fine for the children of hedge fund managers,
  • ...

A new study by Dan Goldhaber and colleagues provides loads of descriptive data that document the extent and depth of the teacher quality gap between advantaged and disadvantaged students. Dan and many others have produced research that repeatedly shows that disadvantaged kids get the short end of the stick when it comes to high-quality teachers. But the bottom line of this latest study is that this inequitable distribution of teachers plays out no matter how you define teacher quality (experience, teacher licensure exam score, or value-added estimates) and no matter how you define student disadvantage (free-and-reduced-priced lunch status, underrepresented minority...

Education reformers talk a lot about providing disadvantaged kids access to great schools, and for good reason. Countless institutional barriers exist to thwart students from choosing the best nearby schools, and solutions like open enrollment and private school scholarships are justly lauded as escape routes for families caged by circumstances of class.

But there are also much more literal obstructions to educational choice, and they aren’t arrayed solely against low-income learners trapped in huge, failing urban districts. To choose just one example, children enrolled in rural and remote schools—separated by hundreds of miles from the auxiliary services...

This book out of Harvard’s Public Educational Leadership Project (PELP) takes on one of the biggest challenges in managing school districts: the relationship between the central office and schools. In meeting needs that vary from building to building, do certain governance structures work better than others? For example, is it better to centralize and make all the decisions “downtown” or decentralize and give autonomy to schools?

Researchers analyzed five large urban districts in four states with varying approaches to their central office/schools relationships, all of which were selected based on improvements in student achievement. The districts shared other similarities, such...

The importance of vocabulary, ESEA reauthorization efforts, school discipline, and how school environment affects teacher effectiveness.

Amber's Research Minute

State-funded voucher programs have stoked political controversy, culture clashes, and pitched court battles. In Ohio, vouchers (aka "scholarships") enable students without access to a good public school--or limited means--to attend a private school. Research has consistently shown that voucher programs benefit the kids who participate: higher achievement, higher odds of graduating high school, and a greater likelihood of attending college.
 
But what do we know about the private schools that educate voucher students? How has school life changed? Can they uphold their distinctive mission, values, and culture--even as they participate in a state-run program? Very little is known.
 
In Fordham's latest research venture, we sought to understand what happens in schools that take voucher students. We enlisted veteran journalist and former Dayton Daily News editorial-page editor Ellen Belcher who visited five private schools across the Buckeye State. The findings of our research will be released in a groundbreaking report Pluck and Tenacity: How five private schools in Ohio have adapted to vouchers.
 
Please join the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, Ellen Belcher, four private-school leaders (including a newly-confirmed principal from Toledo), and education-policy experts to discuss the fascinating findings of this new report and their policy implications.
 
Policy Leaders Panelists
Sarah Pechan Driver - Senior Director of Programs, School Choice Ohio
Greg Harris - State Director - Ohio StudentsFirst
Larry Keough - Associate Director, Department on Education, Catholic Conference of Ohio
 
MODERATOR
Chad Aldis - Vice President for Ohio Policy and Advocacy, Thomas B. Fordham Institute

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