Ohio Policy

In 2012, Denver and New Orleans became the first two cities in the country to utilize a common enrollment system that included...
Since its birth in 1997, Ohio’s charter school program has been on a bumpy ride. Overall sector quality has been mixed, and Ohio...
When the Foundation for Excellence in Education released its first “Digital Learning Report Card” in 2011, the state-by-state...
In 2006, Ohio enacted one of the nation’s first “default closure” laws, which requires the lowest-performing charter schools to...
Are states dutifully reporting the fraction of students who are on track for college or career? According to a new report from...
Much attention has been paid to why teachers quit . Statistics and studies get thrown around , and there are countless theories...
The education components of Governor Kasich’s proposed budget—and the House's subsequent revisions —made a big splash in Ohio's...
Intra-district choice has long been a type of school choice supported by many people who don’t really like school choice. Since...
By Deven Carlson and Stéphane Lavertu School Closures and Student Achievement: An Analysis of Ohio’s Urban District and Charter...
How should city-level leaders manage a portfolio of schools? The first thing they should do is take stock of the city’s supply of...
Thank you Chair Hite, Vice Chair Sawyer, and subcommittee members for giving me the opportunity to testify today in support of...
Marianne Lombardo
EDITOR’S NOTE: The original version of this commentary was published on EdReform Now’s blog on April 8. The post contrasted...
A February study from the Center for Education Data and Research aims to determine if National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs)...
In a previous post , I referred to New York’s fierce political battle over teacher evaluations. Since then, New York lawmakers...
In a 2011 Education Next article called “ The Middle School Mess ,” Peter Meyer equated middle school with bungee jumping: a...
In a previous post , I explained competency-based or “mastery” grading: a restructuring of the common grade system that...
In his proposed budget , Governor John Kasich calls for the creation of a competency-based education pilot program. Competency-...
Rick Hess opens his book, The Same Thing Over and Over , by asking readers to imagine the following scenario: How would you...
It may not be obvious at first blush, but the political fight happening in New York right now over teacher evaluations has...
We recently looked at an analysis of New Orleans school leaders’ perceptions of competition and their responses to it. The top...
Boarding schools are often associated with the rich and the privileged; as such, they are seen as an out-of-reach option for low-...
A torrent of complaints has been levelled against testing in recent months. Some of the criticism is associated with the PARCC...
Ohio has been a hotbed of education reform in recent years, but two policy areas remain mostly virgin territory: teacher...
As Ohio marches through testing season, concerns continue to surface over whether the state's New Learning Standards are in the...
Over 120,000 charter students in Ohio deserve the opportunity to receive an excellent education. But far too often, Ohio charters...
Charter schools are quickly becoming a defining feature of Ohio’s public-education landscape, educating over 120,000 children...

Amid way too much talk about testing and the Common Core, not enough attention is being paid to what parents will actually learn about their children’s achievement when results are finally released from the recent round of state assessments (most of which assert that they’re “aligned” with the Common Core).

Ever since states adopted more rigorous standards—and the two assessment consortia began to develop next-generation tests that will faithfully gauge pupil performance in relation to those standards—there’s been vast anxiety about the bad news that’s apt to emerge. How will people react when informed that their kids aren’t doing nearly...

Darned USPS.

It appears that back in 2001 or so, now-Governor of Delaware Jack Markell wrote an opinion piece about private school choice. Because of some snafu at the post office, his letter just recently made it to Education Week.

Though some education issues are evergreen (say, the importance of highly effective teachers and strong content standards), much has changed over the last decade-plus in the world of private school choice. Unfortunately, for Markell (well, and for all of us), his out-of-date column was published.

If the governor could call a do-over, I’m sure he’d make adjustments...

  • Like raucous pep rallies, autumn school-supply binges, and despising every page of Ethan Frome, there’s something comfortingly banal about multiple choice tests. But there have always been doubts about the benefits of having kids choose between four potential antonyms for “circumscribe.” As a corrective, the Common Core-aligned PARCC and Smarter Balanced tests feature sections devoted to “performance tasks”—longer, in-depth assignments designed to evaluate strategic and critical thinking. The new approach combines a short classroom activity with complex individual components, such as argumentative essays or multi-step math problems. While advocates claim that the exercises give a fuller picture of students’
  • ...

Achieve has spent a decade relentlessly tracking and reporting on states’ progress in adopting “college- and career-ready” (CCR) policies and practices across multiple fronts. Sometimes we’ve found their reports too rosy, or at least too credulous, with a tendency to credit state assertions that they’re doing something rather than looking under the surface to see whether it’s really happening.

This year’s report is more solid, more fact-based—and more worrying. Consider, for example, its list of fourteen states that “still do not have any form of statewide graduation requirements that require or even suggest (as states with opt-in CCR courses of...

In the age of college- and career-ready standards, the education reform community is finally jumping on the career and technical education (CTE) bandwagon—and with good reason. As Mike Petrilli recently noted, “The best CTE programs, like Career Academies, tend to do a better job with both career skills and academic skills, and create a glide path for students into postsecondary education of the technical variety. Long-term outcomes are very promising, especially for low-income students and African American boys.” But what makes a good CTE program, and how can we ensure that students are benefiting from them?

Reading Visher and...

The National Center for Education Statistics released the fourth study in a series designed to evaluate high school students’ transition to postsecondary education. The primary focus of the report is a nationally representative sample of roughly fifteen thousand students whom researchers surveyed three times: in 2002, when the students were high school sophomores; in 2006, two years after graduation; and again in 2012, eight years after graduation. Researchers also obtained high school transcripts and, if applicable, at least one postsecondary transcript for every member of the cohort, and disaggregated the data by a variety of factors, including demographics, parent education...

Common Core-aligned tests, career and technical education, liberal arts in elementary schools, and non-cognitive measures. 

Amber's Research Minute

The promise of upward mobility is central to education reform. Parents, educators, and researchers hope that if we can prepare low-income students for college and career, they will have the tools they need to enter the middle class as adults. But Robert Putnam’s new book, Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis, argues that a growing opportunity gap is making such hopes look naïve.
 
As Putnam contends, the cycle of poverty is stronger than ever. What aspects of our current education system are contributing to this trend? And more importantly, what reforms are needed?
 
Robert Putnam discusses his new book and how education reform can help to restore the American dream for our kids.
 
Follow the conversation on twitter with @educationgadfly at #OurKids.

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