Additional Topics

BIGGER IS BETTER
new study highlights the importance of even earlier early education, finding that having a higher birth weight leads to higher cognitive development. “Weight, of course, may partly be an indicator of broader fetal health, but it seems to be a meaningful one: The chunkier the baby, the better it does on average, all the way up to almost 10 pounds.” But birth weight is not the be-all and end-all: Researcher David Figlio was 5 pounds, 15 ounces at birth.

DUELING BANJOS ON THE HELP COMMITTEE
Which senator played the washboard with a spoon in a banjo band? It's a question the Politics K–12 duo asks in a quiz of (useful) facts about the likely heads of the next Senate HELP Committee. The primer matters to wonks because, “[n]o matter which party comes out ahead on Election Day, the Senate's Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee will have a new leader.”

COMMON CORE AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
Three states are plowing ahead on tying graduation requirements and Common Core-aligned assessments, “a...

  1. The latest legislative assault against Common Core in Ohio is rumbling back to life this evening with what is supposed to be testimony from teachers who support repeal of the Common Core. Ahead of this testimony, the Chillicothe Gazette looked at some specific math problems aligned to Common Core and solicited responses on them from teachers and professors on both sides of the issue. Some good stuff here…much of which will not be part of tonight’s hearing. (Chillicothe Gazette)
     
  2. Discussion of yesterday’s story about the facilities funding set up of Imagine charter schools continues in the expected corners today. The Blade’s piece is typical of them all, with the blasting and the demanding. (Toledo Blade)
     
  3. Springfield City Schools approved a one-to-one technology plan for students in grades three through twelve. But those new laptops and software packages have to be teacher-tested first. This is a story about that. Apparently, there was “a lot of oohing and ahhing going on” during the training sessions last week. (Springfield News-Sun)
     
  4. It is that time of year again: school district treasurers releasing their five-year funding forecasts. Canton City Schools continues to lose students – EdChoice vouchers are the
  5. ...

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT
The New York Times's Motoko Rich reports that some public charter school systems are implementing a new model of teacher preparation: residencies, similar to those in the medical field. The programs focus on practice over theory and match veteran educators with aspiring teachers in a structured mentorship. The piece offers a great look into the anxieties of new teachers and the critical importance of feedback from veteran mentors.

TENNESSEE MULLING COMMON CORE
In a recent interview with Chalkbeat, the Speaker of the Tennessee House of Representatives, Beth Harwell, suggested that the state might be on its way to dropping Common Core. However, her spokesperson’s claim that “Tennessee—and not the federal government—knows what is best for Tennesseans” would seem to suggest that the Speaker isn’t aware of what the standards actually do. 

THE DANGERS OF BIAS
At Education Week, Darius D. Prier asks how educators can address stereotypes and ensure safety and equality for students inside and outside of schools. Prier recommends that schools incorporate current-day race issues into the curriculum, along with other ideas for preventing hip-hop culture from being conflated with criminality.

DROPPING OUT IS HARD TO DO
...

At his confirmation hearing in 2009, Senator Lamar Alexander famously told Arne Duncan that “President-elect Obama has made several distinguished cabinet appointments, but in my view of it all, I think you are the best.” Duncan had already made statements indicating a willingness to embrace charter schools and break with the unions over teacher evaluations—sentiments not typically expressed by Democratic secretaries of education. And on many issues, Secretary Duncan has not disappointed, regularly pushing a pro-education-reform line, especially via his bully pulpit.

Most intriguing about Secretary Duncan—from my perspective at least—was his early embrace of the theory of “tight-loose” federalism. As he put it in 2012,“ the federal government should be tight on goals,” but state and local leaders should decide how to attain them. “Local leaders, not us, know their children and communities best—to try to micromanage 100,000 schools from Washington would be the height of arrogance,” he said.

Indeed it would be. But trying to micromanage 100,000 schools from Washington is precisely what Duncan has been doing.

In fact, Duncan’s greatest failure—on par with politicizing the Common Core and trying to kill D.C.’s school voucher program—has been his unwillingness to follow through on the “loose” part of his...

  1. We’re back after a short break, and there’s a lot to talk about, so let’s get right to it. The board chair of Fordham-sponsored Dayton Leadership Academy penned a guest column in the Dayton Daily News last Friday, highlighting signs of success for DLA students buried deep in this year’s report card data. Nice. (Dayton Daily News)
     
  2. Fordham’s Chad Aldis is quoted in a story from yesterday’s Dispatch, looking at the lease deals under which Imagine charter schools occupy the buildings in which they operate. There’s probably some more info required to make sense out of these numbers. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  3. I don’t want to argue causation, but just as soon as Gadfly Bites took its hiatus, a breakthrough occurred and the Reynoldsburg teachers strike ended. (ThisWeek News/Reynoldsburg News)
     
  4. The Big D took a look at the details of the new contract in Reynoldsburg – as far as they were known at the time – and tried to parse what this will mean for teachers (and students) for the next three years. (Columbus Dispatch)
     
  5. There are still a few issues to work out in Reynoldsburg as teachers return to the classroom. Today’s article
  6. ...

EIGHTY PERCENT OF LIFE IS JUST SHOWING UP
Chronic absenteeism is a huge and often overlooked problem in America's schools. A new Education Week op-ed finds that students who miss four or more days in their first month are unlikely to keep up with grade-level achievement standards. In one study, only 17 percent of chronically absent kindergartners and first graders achieved reading proficiency by third grade. 

DECLINING TEACHER PREP IN CALIFORNIA
Teacher preparation programs in California have seen a downturn in enrollment recently, particularly in high-need areas such as math and science. Figures released for the 2012–13 school year highlight a decline of nearly three-quarters from a peak of 77,000 in 200102. On the bright side, a growing number of ethnically diverse applicants are entering the profession. 

EDUCATION SNAPSHOT
Teachers in Waukegan, Illinois, are on strike for the seventh day, with no likely end in sight. The work stoppage has shuttered two dozens schools in the cityhometown of science-fiction great Ray Bradbury—which sits on Lake Michigan roughly forty miles north of Chicago. Federal mediators have been participating in the negotiations.

MUST READ
On the heels of Nick...

START SPREADING THE NEWS
Great news for students at underperforming district schools in New York City: On Wednesday, the Empire State approved seventeen new charter schools throughout the city, including fourteen within the Success Academy network. Time will tell if the move leads to a rematch of the de Blasio-Moskowitz title bout from this spring.

CHARTER GROWTH IN D.C.
Elsewhere in the Chartersphere, recently released figures from the D.C. Public Charter School Board indicate a 3 percent increase in the number of children enrolled in Washington, D.C. charters. Overall, 44 percent of D.C. students attend charter schools.

TEACHING TEENS
In an interview at the Mindshift blog, Temple University's brilliant Laurence Steinberg explains the theories behind his new book, Age of Opportunity: Lessons from the New Science of Adolescence. Steinberg discusses peer pressure, the structure of the academic year, and the plasticity of the human brain as it enters adulthood. For more information (as well as the dulcet voice of Fordham's own Mike Petrilli), listen to Steinberg break it down at the Education Next...

Howard Fuller’s new memoir, No Struggle, No Progress, tells the inspiring story of how a boy in the Jim Crow South became the larger-than-life education leader we know today. There is much to take away from Fuller’s trailblazing career. A former superintendent of Milwaukee Public Schools and current distinguished education professor at Marquette University, Fuller has done as much as anyone to place the issue of education at the center of the civil rights movement. His own upbringing in Shreveport, Louisiana, and the daily injustice he saw in his own neighborhood reinforced his belief that “education offers the best route out of poverty for individuals.” After graduating from Montana’s Carroll College, Fuller worked as a community organizer in North Carolina. Throughout the 1960s and ‘70s he led marches and at one point founded his own Afrocentric college, Malcolm X Liberation University, but a 1971 journey to Africa challenged his vision of pan-African solidarity. Seeing firsthand the continent’s social and economic inequality, as well as with the grim realities of actual warfare, led him to rethink his assumptions about what the American civil rights movement really meant. Dr. Fuller, who became closely associated with school choice and vouchers, now warns us...

This report from the Center for American Progress sets out to demonstrate that research about how students learn, as well as “best practices” for teaching, are embedded directly into the Common Core State Standards. An interesting conceit, but the supporting evidence is mixed. The report rightly draws attention to Common Core’s call for a strong knowledge base across subject areas—a singular feature of the English language arts standards, and one that is too often overlooked. In emphasizing the need for a coherent, sequential curriculum, Common Core functionally reasserts E.D. Hirsch’s insight that reading comprehension is less a “skill” than a reflection of the reader’s background knowledge, which also drives critical thinking, problem solving, and a host of cognitive abilities devoutly wished for by teachers. “Prior knowledge is a critical and often determining factor in how well a student learns new concepts,” Marchitello and Wilhelm note. “In fact, some researchers believe that prior knowledge exceeds aptitude in determining learning—that what students know is more important than their raw intelligence.” Just so. The report could have done the field a solid had the authors stopped right there. The point can never be made often or strongly enough that a well-rounded education in...

With new Common Core-aligned assessments on the horizon—and states beginning to link accountability systems to student mastery of the new standards—the current school year undoubtedly represents a major milestone for the Common Core. Amid wavering public approval and mounting political opposition, how is it actually going on the ground? A new report released by the Center on Education Policy (CEP) today sheds light on a wide range of issues, including district perceptions of the standards themselves, implementation progress, and common challenges to date. Based on survey responses from leaders in 211 districts, findings range from promising to concerning. Encouragingly, about 90 percent of district leaders believe the CCSS are more rigorous than their state’s prior mathematics and English language arts (ELA) standards, and three-quarters believe Common Core will improve students’ math and ELA skills (both reflecting substantial increases from a similar CEP survey of district leaders administered in 2011). However, district leaders also cite major challenges, including concerns about state officials reevaluating the adoption of CCSS or putting implementation on hold, needing to explain potential drops in student performance on Core assessments to stakeholders, and having insufficient time to get implementation right before tying high-stakes accountability measures to student learning....

Pages